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Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Breonna Taylor, 2020 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Support

Show Me the Signs

November 10–30, 2020

Show Me the Signs is an online benefit auction hosted by Artfizz to support the families of Black women killed by the police. Over 100 artists have created pieces in the form of protest signs for the auction, with 100 percent of the proceeds going to the African American Policy Forum’s #SayHerName Mothers Network. Work by Louise Bonnet, Piero Golia, Meleko Mokgosi, Nathaniel Mary Quinn, and Nancy Rubins is included. To register to bid, visit artfizz.com.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Breonna Taylor, 2020 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Nancy Rubins, Crocodylius Philodendrus, 2016–17 © Nancy Rubins. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Public Installation

Sculpture in the City 2019
Nancy Rubins

June 2019–April 2020
Various locations in London
www.sculptureinthecity.org.uk

Nancy Rubins’s Crocodylius Philodendrus (2016–17) has remained on view in London’s Square Mile to be featured again in Sculpture in the City, an annual urban sculpture park. Clusters of animal forms are arranged in balanced compression and secured with tensile cables. “Tensegrity,” the term for the structural property that Rubins employs, galvanizes the aluminum, brass, bronze, and cast iron animals into purely formal, abstract components that propel into space due to their aggregate momentum. The work is from her series Diversifolia, which was first exhibited last year at Gagosian, Britannia Street, London.

Nancy Rubins, Crocodylius Philodendrus, 2016–17 © Nancy Rubins. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Nancy Rubins, Crocodylius Philodendrus, 2016–17 (detail) © Nancy Rubins. Photo: Brian Guido

Public Installation

Nancy Rubins in
Sculpture in the City 2018

June 27, 2018–April 15, 2019
Various locations in London
www.sculptureinthecity.org.uk

Nancy Rubins’s Crocodylius Philodendrus (2016–17) is featured in Sculpture in the City, an annual urban sculpture park set in London’s Square Mile. Clusters of animal forms are arranged in balanced compression and secured with tensile cables. “Tensegrity,” the term for the structural property that Rubins employs, galvanizes the bronze animals into purely formal, abstract components that propel into space due to their aggregate momentum. The work is from her series Diversifolia, which was first exhibited at Gagosian, Britannia Street, London, earlier this year.

Nancy Rubins, Crocodylius Philodendrus, 2016–17 (detail) © Nancy Rubins. Photo: Brian Guido

Nancy Rubins, Study: Big Edge, 2009. Photo: Rob Ebeltoft

Installation

Nancy Rubins

August 3–6, 2017
CenturyLink Field Event Center, Seattle 
www.seattleartfair.com

Three sculptures by Nancy Rubins will be installed throughout the public areas of the Seattle Art Fair. Known for her large-scale assemblages of found objects, this selected presentation of studies allows for an intimate consideration of the artist’s iconic boat sculptures and reveals the system of compression and tension utilized in the large-scale works. 

Nancy Rubins, Study: Big Edge, 2009. Photo: Rob Ebeltoft

Photo: Joel Searles

In Conversation

Nancy Rubins
Jenny Gheith

Saturday, August 5, 2017, 3:30pm
CenturyLink Field Event Center, Seattle
www.seattleartfair.com

Nancy Rubins will discuss her artistic practice of transforming industrial, manufactured objects—such as mattresses, appliances, and boats—into physically commanding monumental sculptures with Jenny Gheith, curator at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The event is free with admission to the fair. 

Photo: Joel Searles

Photo: Caren Levin

In Conversation

Nancy Rubins
Tyler Green

Thursday, April 13, 2017, 4:30pm
Film/Video Theater, Wexner Center
for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio
www.wexarts.org

Wexner Center for the Arts will host a talk with Nancy Rubins and Tyler Green, which will later be broadcast on Green’s award-winning, influential podcast The Modern Art Notes. The pair will discuss Rubins’s practice and her participation in the exhibition Gray Matters, which explores the work of artists in the nuanced realm between black and white, and which opens  at the Wexner Center on May 20. The event is free and open to the public.

Photo: Caren Levin