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Leo Castelli

An Exhibition in Honor of His Gallery and Artists

January 27–March 2, 1996
Beverly Hills

LEO CASTELLI: AN EXHIBITION IN HONOR OF HIS GALLERY AND ARTISTS Installation view

LEO CASTELLI: AN EXHIBITION IN HONOR OF HIS GALLERY AND ARTISTS

Installation view

Works Exhibited

Jasper Johns, Untitled, 1991 Encaustic and sand on canvas, 48 × 60 inches (121.9 × 152.4 cm)

Jasper Johns, Untitled, 1991

Encaustic and sand on canvas, 48 × 60 inches (121.9 × 152.4 cm)

Roy Lichtenstein, Endless Drip, 1995 Fabricated and painted aluminum, 142 ¼ × 13 ½ × 4 ½ inches (361.3 × 34.3 × 11.4 cm), edition of 3

Roy Lichtenstein, Endless Drip, 1995

Fabricated and painted aluminum, 142 ¼ × 13 ½ × 4 ½ inches (361.3 × 34.3 × 11.4 cm), edition of 3

James Rosenquist, Personal Differences, 1996 Oil on canvas, 48 × 48 inches (121.9 × 121.9 cm)

James Rosenquist, Personal Differences, 1996

Oil on canvas, 48 × 48 inches (121.9 × 121.9 cm)

Ed Ruscha, An Exhibition of Gasoline Powered Engines, 1993 Acrylic on canvas, 84 × 84 inches (213.4 × 213.4 cm)

Ed Ruscha, An Exhibition of Gasoline Powered Engines, 1993

Acrylic on canvas, 84 × 84 inches (213.4 × 213.4 cm)

Richard Serra, Duane Street, 1996 Paintstick on paper, 54 × 52 inches (137.2 × 132.1 cm)

Richard Serra, Duane Street, 1996

Paintstick on paper, 54 × 52 inches (137.2 × 132.1 cm)

Robert Therrien, No Title (black cloud with faucets), 1996 Enamel on hand-formed plastic, 68 × 124 × 47 inches (172.7 × 315 × 119.4 cm)Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Robert Therrien, No Title (black cloud with faucets), 1996

Enamel on hand-formed plastic, 68 × 124 × 47 inches (172.7 × 315 × 119.4 cm)
Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Cy Twombly, Naumackia, 1992 Tempera and pencil on paper, 30 × 22 inches (76.2 × 55.9 cm)

Cy Twombly, Naumackia, 1992

Tempera and pencil on paper, 30 × 22 inches (76.2 × 55.9 cm)

About

Continuing the inauguration of the new Gagosian in Beverly Hills, this major exhibition will bring together new and recent painting and sculpture, as well as historical examples, by artists fostered and represented by Leo Castelli.

From the opening of his first gallery in Paris in 1935, just prior to the outbreak of World War II, to the establishment of his celebrated New York gallery in 1957, Leo Castelli has achieved in his profession the greatest possible influence, discernment, and creativity. The landscape of postwar art in America might have been different from what it is, were it not for his insight and encouragement.

The artists who will be included in this tribute are Hanne Darboven, Jasper Johns, Ellsworth Kelly, Joseph Kosuth, Roy Lichtenstein, Bruce Nauman, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Ed Ruscha, David Salle, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, Robert Therrien, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol, and Lawrence Weiner.

Anna Weyant’s Two Eileens (2022) on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Winter 2022

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Winter 2022

The Winter 2022 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Anna Weyant’s Two Eileens (2022) on its cover.

Richard Serra: Johann Sebastian Bach, performed by Alina Ibragimova

Richard Serra: Johann Sebastian Bach, performed by Alina Ibragimova

Violinist Alina Ibragimova performs Bach’s Sonata for Solo Violin No. 1 in G Major: Adagio (BWV 1001, c. 1720) from within Richard Serra’s sculpture Transmitter (2020) at Gagosian, Le Bourget. Organized by Bold Tendencies, a nonprofit organization that commissions artists to produce site-specific projects and present performances, in collaboration with Gagosian, this recorded performance took place on May 8, 2022 before a live concert of Olivier Messiaen’s Quatuor pour la fin du temps (Quartet for the End of Time, 1941).

Richard Serra: Johann Sebastian Bach, performed by Mario Brunello

Richard Serra: Johann Sebastian Bach, performed by Mario Brunello

Cellist Mario Brunello performs Bach’s Cello Suite No. 1 in G Major: Prelude (BWV 1007, c. 1717–23) within Richard Serra’s sculpture Transmitter (2020) at Gagosian, Le Bourget. Organized by Bold Tendencies—a nonprofit that commissions artists to produce site-specific projects and present performances—in collaboration with Gagosian, this recorded performance took place on May 8, 2022, before a live concert of Olivier Messiaen’s Quatuor pour la fin du temps (Quartet for the End of Time, 1941).

Image of Cy Twombly's Treatise on the Veil (Second Version), 1970

Cy Twombly: Imperfect Paradise

Eleonora Di Erasmo, cocurator of Un/veiled: Cy Twombly, Music, Inspirations, a program of concerts, video screenings, and works by Cy Twombly at the Fondazione Nicola Del Roscio, Rome, reflects on the resonances and networks of inspiration between the artist and music. The program was the result of an extensive three-year study, done at the behest of Nicola Del Roscio in the Rome and Gaeta offices of the Cy Twombly Foundation, intended to collect, document, and preserve compositions by musicians around the world who have been inspired by Twombly’s work, or to establish an artistic dialogue with them.

Black and white image of the interior of Cy Twombly’s apartment in Rome

Cy Twombly: Making Past Present

In 2020, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, announced their plan for a survey of Cy Twombly’s artwork alongside selections from their permanent ancient Greek and Roman collection. The survey was postponed due to the lockdowns necessitated by the coronavirus pandemic, but was revived in 2022 with a presentation at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles from August 2 through October 30. In 2023, the exhibition will arrive at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The curator for the exhibition, Christine Kondoleon, and Kate Nesin, author of Cy Twombly’s Things (2014) and advisor for the show, speak with Gagosian director Mark Francis about the origin of the exhibition and the aesthetic and poetic resonances that give the show its title: Making Past Present.

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Say Goodbye, Catallus, to the Shores of Asia Minor), 1994, oil, acrylic, oil stick, crayon, and graphite on three canvases,

Say Goodbye, Catullus, to the Shores of Asia Minor

Thierry Greub tracks the literary references in Cy Twomblys epic painting of 1994.