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Ed Ruscha

Paintings

November 14, 2020–January 23, 2021
541 West 24th Street, New York

Installation Views

Installation view Artwork © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Rob McKeever

Works Exhibited

Ed Ruscha, Untitled, 2020 Acrylic on canvas, 32 × 48 inches (81.3 × 121.9 cm)© Ed Ruscha. Photo: Paul Ruscha

Ed Ruscha, Untitled, 2020

Acrylic on canvas, 32 × 48 inches (81.3 × 121.9 cm)
© Ed Ruscha. Photo: Paul Ruscha

Ed Ruscha, Hardscrabble, 2020 Acrylic on canvas, 32 × 48 inches (81.3 × 122 cm)© Ed Ruscha. Photo: Paul Ruscha

Ed Ruscha, Hardscrabble, 2020

Acrylic on canvas, 32 × 48 inches (81.3 × 122 cm)
© Ed Ruscha. Photo: Paul Ruscha

Ed Ruscha, Gators, 2020 Acrylic on canvas, 24 × 96 inches (61 × 243.8 cm)© Ed Ruscha. Photo: Paul Ruscha

Ed Ruscha, Gators, 2020

Acrylic on canvas, 24 × 96 inches (61 × 243.8 cm)
© Ed Ruscha. Photo: Paul Ruscha

Ed Ruscha, Mountains, 2020 Acrylic on canvas, 24 × 96 inches (61 × 243.8 cm)© Ed Ruscha. Photo: Paul Ruscha

Ed Ruscha, Mountains, 2020

Acrylic on canvas, 24 × 96 inches (61 × 243.8 cm)
© Ed Ruscha. Photo: Paul Ruscha

Ed Ruscha, Geo This, Geo That, 2020 Acrylic on canvas, 24 × 96 inches (61 × 243.8 cm)© Ed Ruscha. Photo: Rob McKeever

Ed Ruscha, Geo This, Geo That, 2020

Acrylic on canvas, 24 × 96 inches (61 × 243.8 cm)
© Ed Ruscha. Photo: Rob McKeever

Ed Ruscha, RIPPLING FLAG, 2020 Acrylic on canvas, 24 × 96 inches (61 × 243.8 cm)© Ed Ruscha. Photo: Paul Ruscha

Ed Ruscha, RIPPLING FLAG, 2020

Acrylic on canvas, 24 × 96 inches (61 × 243.8 cm)
© Ed Ruscha. Photo: Paul Ruscha

Ed Ruscha, Top of Flag, 2020 Acrylic on canvas, 24 × 96 inches (61 × 243.8 cm)© Ed Ruscha. Photo: Paul Ruscha

Ed Ruscha, Top of Flag, 2020

Acrylic on canvas, 24 × 96 inches (61 × 243.8 cm)
© Ed Ruscha. Photo: Paul Ruscha

Ed Ruscha, Untitled, 2020 Acrylic on canvas, 24 × 96 inches (61 × 243.8 cm)© Ed Ruscha. Photo: Rob McKeever

Ed Ruscha, Untitled, 2020

Acrylic on canvas, 24 × 96 inches (61 × 243.8 cm)
© Ed Ruscha. Photo: Rob McKeever

About

Deterioration is a fertile area to explore.
—Ed Ruscha

Gagosian is pleased to present an exhibition of new paintings by Ed Ruscha.

Since the 1960s, Ruscha has created a distinctive and ever-expanding lexicon of signs, symbols, images, and words drawn from vernacular America. His visual utterances, sounds, and concepts—such as the roadside gas station or the word “OOF”—have become embedded in the American ethos. He has presented recurring images—the American flag, mountains, books, and words—that are suggestive yet never didactic, and the development of these images over the course of his illustrious career exemplifies the wry refinement and subtlety with which he speaks through painting.

In these new paintings, Ruscha has chosen to revisit the flag, the mountain, and the tire. Flags entered Ruscha’s visual vocabulary between 1985 and 1987, rippling in the breeze over dramatic sunsets or triumphant blue skies, offset with subtle warning cues of black bars resembling censor strips. The motif returned in OUR FLAG (2017)—currently on view at the Brooklyn Museum, which served as a polling site for the November election—where it disintegrated into shreds set against a near-black sky. The flag becomes newly distorted in RIPPLING FLAG (2020), this time abnormally widened to extend past the right-side frame, its flowing surface creating twisted shapes and shadows over the red and white stripes. In Top of Flag (2020), only a fraction of the standard is visible at the bottom of the canvas, surrounded by a gradation of shadow, almost as though the flag were a setting sun or a dimming spotlight on a stage.

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Press

Polskin Arts
Meagan Jones
meagan.jones@finnpartners.com
+1 212 593 6485

Julia Esposito
julia.esposito@finnpartners.com
+1 212 715 1643

Gagosian
pressny@gagosian.com

Black-and-white photograph: Donald Marron, c. 1984.

Donald Marron

Jacoba Urist profiles the legendary collector.

Alexander Calder poster for McGovern, 1972, lithograph

The Art History of Presidential Campaign Posters

Against the backdrop of the 2020 US presidential election, historian Hal Wert takes us through the artistic and political evolution of American campaign posters, from their origin in 1844 to the present. In an interview with Quarterly editor Gillian Jakab, Wert highlights an array of landmark posters and the artists who made them.

Ed Ruscha, At That, 2020, dry pigment and acrylic on paper.

“Things Fall Apart”: Ed Ruscha’s Swiped Words

Lisa Turvey examines the range of effects conveyed by the blurred phrases in recent drawings by the artist, detailing the ways these words in motion evoke the experience of the current moment.

Andy Warhol cover design for the magazine Aspen 1, no. 3.

Artists’ Magazines

Gwen Allen recounts her discovery of cutting-edge artists’ magazines from the 1960s and 1970s and explores the roots and implications of these singular publications.

A painting with gold frame by Louis Michel Eilshemius. Landscape with single figure.

Eilshemius and Me: An Interview with Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha tells Viet-Nu Nguyen and Leta Grzan how he first encountered Louis Michel Eilshemius’s paintings, which of the artist’s aesthetic innovations captured his imagination, and how his own work relates to and differs from that of this “Neglected Marvel.”

River Café menu with illustration by Ed Ruscha.

The River Café Cookbook

London’s River Café, a culinary mecca perched on a bend in the River Thames, celebrated its thirtieth anniversary in 2018. To celebrate this milestone and the publication of her cookbook River Café London, cofounder Ruth Rogers sat down with Derek Blasberg to discuss the famed restaurant’s allure.