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Gagosian Quarterly

February 17, 2017

douglas gordon andMorgane Tschiember

Set in the mountainous region of Gstaad, Switzerland, the exhibition Elevation 1049: Avalanche showcases the alpine landscape with site-specific sculpture, performance, video, and sound installations. Douglas Gordon, with French artist Morgane Tschiember, contributed As close as you can for as long as it lasts. The work originated as a live performance: Tschiember built a fire—the only thing that can help you survive in this harsh environment—and Gordon responded by installing a sound piece based on our primal fears—unknown animals, the dark—driving us toward Tschiember’s fire.

Artwork © Studio lost but found /2017, ProLitteris, Zurich. Produced by Vinyl Factory, 2017. Douglas Gordon & Morgane Tschiember: As long as you can for as long as it lasts at Elevation 1049, Gstaad, Switzerland, February 3–March 19, 2017.

Douglas Gordon

Douglas Gordon

Katrina Brown discusses the importance of Douglas Gordon’s 24 Hour Psycho (1993) and some of the films that followed, touching on threads that run throughout the artist’s career.

Gagosian Quarterly Spring 2018

Gagosian Quarterly Spring 2018

The Spring 2018 Gagosian Quarterly with a cover by Ed Ruscha is now available for order.

Douglas Gordon: I had nowhere to go

Douglas Gordon: I had nowhere to go

Featuring an extensive interview with Douglas Gordon on the process of making his 2016 film I had nowhere to go: Portrait of a displaced person, this video, produced by Berlin Art Link, includes clips of Jonas Mekas and revealing anecdotes about the creation of the film.

Making Eyes: Douglas Gordon

Making Eyes: Douglas Gordon

Douglas Gordon and Rufus Wainwright collaborated to produce afflictive, slow-motion projections to accompany Wainwright’s performances during his 2010 All Days Are Nights: Songs for Lulu tour.

Portrait of Sir John Richardson, New York, 2005. Photo: Janette Beckman/Getty Images

The Art of Biography: Sir John Richardson’s “The Minotaur Years”

Pepe Karmel celebrates the release of A Life of Picasso IV: The Minotaur Years, 1933–1943, the final installment of Sir John Richardson’s magisterial biography.

Tyler Mitchell, Untitled (Lunarlander), 2021

Social Works II: Tyler Mitchell | A New Landscape

Tyler Mitchell speaks with Antwaun Sargent about Black representation, the diversity of Southern landscapes, and the importance of play in his new series of photographs. The conversation forms part of “Social Works II,” a supplement guest edited by Sargent for the Winter 2021 issue of the Quarterly.

Diego Rivera, The Making of a Fresco Showing the Building of a City, installation view, San Francisco Art Institute (SFAI)

The San Francisco Art Institute: Its History and Future

Constance Lewallen marks the 150th anniversary of the San Francisco Art Institute, exploring the school’s evolution and pioneering faculty, as well as current challenges and the innovations necessary for its preservation.

Shelley Duvall in Robert Altman’s 3 Women (1977). Photo: Photo 12/Alamy Stock Photo

Shelley Duvall

Every era has a handful of actors who embody the moods and aesthetics of their time. Carlos Valladares looks back to the 1970s, the time of New Hollywood, and argues for the singular contemporaneity of Shelley Duvall.

Dennis Hopper, 1969. Photo: Columbia Pictures/Album/Alamy Stock Photo.

Dennis Hopper’s Taos Ride

Douglas Dreishpoon reflects on speaking with Hopper at the Harwood Museum of Art, Taos, New Mexico, in 2009.

Taryn Simon, “Folder: Broken Objects” (detail), from the series The Picture Collection, 2012, framed archival inkjet print, 47 × 62 inches (119.4 × 157.5 cm) © Taryn Simon

The New York Public Library’s Picture Collection

Joshua Chuang, the Robert B. Menschel Senior Curator of Photography at the New York Public Library, discusses the institution’s singular Picture Collection, the artist Taryn Simon’s rigorous engagement with it, and four instances of its little-known role in the history of art making.

Left: Jordan Belson, Berkeley, California, c. 1946. Photo: courtesy Estate of Jordan Belson. Right: Harry Smith (front) and Lionel Ziprin, New York City, c. 1952. Photo: Joanne Ziprin, courtesy Lionel Ziprin Archives

Delineators: Jordan Belson and Harry Smith

Raymond Foye tracks the relationship between the two mavericks, investigating their influence on one another and their enduring legacies.

Ming Smith, Self-Portrait as Josephine, New York, 1986

On Ming Smith: A Life of Magical Thinking

An interview by Nicola Vassell.