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Gagosian Quarterly

September 24, 2019

In Conversation

Nathaniel Mary Quinn and Troy Carter

On the evening before the opening of his first exhibition with Gagosian, in Beverly Hills, Nathaniel Mary Quinn joined Troy Carter for a conversation at LA’s Hammer Museum. They spoke about deliverance, Quinn’s new work, and what drives him to make art.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn in conversation with Troy Carter, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, September 10, 2019; introduction by Ann Philbin; video: courtesy Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Nathaniel Mary Quinn: Hollow and Cut, Gagosian, Beverly Hills, September 11–October 19, 2019

Gisele Castro and Nathaniel Mary Quinn at exalt’s annual gala, New York, 2017

The Bigger Picture
Exalt: Youth Justice Can’t Stop

As 2020 came to a close, Nathaniel Mary Quinn spoke with Gisele Castro, executive director of exalt, a New York City nonprofit dedicated to transforming the lives of court-involved youth by providing a path to success through effective educational engagement. Quinn is a former educator at exalt and now serves as a member of the organization’s board.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn in his studio

Nathaniel Mary Quinn: In the Studio

Hear the painter describe the creation of a new work in this time-lapse documentation of his process.

A portrait of Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Nathaniel Mary Quinn

A statement from the artist.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Brooklyn, New York, 2019.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Anderson Cooper spoke with the artist at his Brooklyn studio about his childhood and the visionary nature of his art.

The cover of the Fall 2019 Gagosian Quarterly magazine. Artwork by Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Fall 2019

The Fall 2019 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring a detail from Sinking (2019) by Nathaniel Mary Quinn on its cover.

Still from video Visions of the Self: Jenny Saville on Rembrandt

Visions of the Self: Jenny Saville on Rembrandt

Jenny Saville reveals the process behind her new self-portrait, painted in response to Rembrandt’s masterpiece Self-Portrait with Two Circles.

Left: Jordan Belson, Berkeley, California, c. 1946. Photo: courtesy Estate of Jordan Belson. Right: Harry Smith (front) and Lionel Ziprin, New York City, c. 1952. Photo: Joanne Ziprin, courtesy Lionel Ziprin Archives

Delineators: Jordan Belson and Harry Smith

Raymond Foye tracks the relationship between the two mavericks, investigating their influence on one another and their enduring legacies.

Charlotte Gainsbourg on a motorscooter in a film still from Jim Jarmusch and Anthony Vaccarello's "French Water"

Fashion and Art: Anthony Vaccarello and Jim Jarmusch

Director Jim Jarmusch and Anthony Vaccarello, the creative director for Saint Laurent, discuss French Water, a new short film collaboration—starring Charlotte Gainsbourg, Indya Moore, Julianne Moore, Chloë Sevigny, and Leo Reilly—in this interview with the Quarterly’s Wyatt Allgeier.

Light blue title page with "Compass" in the center and white line radiating out.

Compass

A short story by Cleyvis Natera, published here on the occasion of the Quarterlys collaboration with pen America.

Gerhard Richter’s Helen (1963) on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Spring 2021

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Spring 2021

The Spring 2021 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Gerhard Richter’s Helen (1963) on its cover.

Francesca Woodman, Untitled, New York, 1979, chromogenic print

Becoming Together

Alison M. Gingeras and Jamieson Webster consider the paradigm shifts brought on by 2020’s biological, psychological, and social crises. The essay serves as an introduction to “New Interiorities,” a supplement they guest edited for the Winter 2020 issue of the Quarterly.

Oil on linen linen painting by Dennis Kardon, titled Transfixed by the Past, depicting a woman holding a snow globe in front of her face seated at a dining table.

You Should Leave

As part of “New Interiorities,” a supplement guest edited by Alison M. Gingeras and Jamieson Webster for the Winter 2020 issue of the Quarterly, Alissa Bennett writes on liminal spaces and self-contemplation within the work of Patricia Highsmith.