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Micro Mania

April 18–May 31, 2012
Paris

Installation view Photo: Zarko Vijatovic

Installation view

Photo: Zarko Vijatovic

Installation view  Photo: Zarko Vijatovic

Installation view

Photo: Zarko Vijatovic

Works Exhibited

Carl Andre, Untitled, 1965 Concrete, 5 ⅞ × 5 ⅞ × 3 ⅞ inches (15 × 15 × 10 cm)

Carl Andre, Untitled, 1965

Concrete, 5 ⅞ × 5 ⅞ × 3 ⅞ inches (15 × 15 × 10 cm)

Lucio Fontana, Concetto spaziale, 1959 Pens on perforated silver foil mounted on gold foil backing, 4 ½ × 3 ⅝ inches (11.4 × 9.2 cm)© Fondazione Lucio Fontana/ADAGP, Paris 2012

Lucio Fontana, Concetto spaziale, 1959

Pens on perforated silver foil mounted on gold foil backing, 4 ½ × 3 ⅝ inches (11.4 × 9.2 cm)
© Fondazione Lucio Fontana/ADAGP, Paris 2012

Alberto Giacometti, Dog, 1965 Bronze, 3 ½ × 9 × 1 ½ inches (9 × 22 × 3.8 cm)© Alberto Giacometti Estate/Licensed by VAGA and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Alberto Giacometti, Dog, 1965

Bronze, 3 ½ × 9 × 1 ½ inches (9 × 22 × 3.8 cm)
© Alberto Giacometti Estate/Licensed by VAGA and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

René Magritte, Sheherazade, 1947 Tempera on paper mounted on mat board, 7 × 5 inches (17.8 × 12.7 cm)© ADAGP, Paris 2012

René Magritte, Sheherazade, 1947

Tempera on paper mounted on mat board, 7 × 5 inches (17.8 × 12.7 cm)
© ADAGP, Paris 2012

About

Where the telescope ends the microscope begins, and who can say which has the wider vision?
—Victor Hugo

Gagosian is pleased to present Micro Mania, an exhibition of the miniature in art featuring nearly sixty small masterpieces by a panorama of modern and contemporary artists including Alexander Calder, Joseph Cornell, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Yves Klein, Jasper Johns, René Magritte, Francis Picabia, Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol, Cecily Brown and Rachel Whiteread.

Accordingly, the Project Space has been transformed into a modern day cabinet de curiosités. A glass vitrine in the center of the gallery contains diminutive sculptures such as Claes Oldenberg’s Pancakes and Sausages (1962), Alexander Calder’s Untitled (Standing Mobile) (1955), Lucio Fontana’s Concetto Spaziale (1959) and Joseph Cornell’s Untitled (1933) which measures less than 3 centimeters in diameter. Among the intimate works that line the walls are Jasper Johns Map (1960), René Magritte’s Schéhérazade (1947), Marcel Duchamp’s Peasant’s Leg (1904–05), and Richard Prince’s Untitled (Fireman Joke) (1987).

These small-scale works seem to belong to a separate, otherworldly realm where the rules of the physical world may no longer hold. With proportions akin to those of a children’s toy, they may function as the starting point to a private narrative and act as an agent for nostalgia and fantasy. Taking inspiration from artist and poet Joe Brainard’s 1975 exhibition Think Tiny, as well as Voltaire’s science-fiction novella Micromegas—which strives to demonstrate that importance is not equitably reduced with size—Micro Mania explores the aesthetic and imaginative qualities unique to the craft of the miniature and creates a dialogue between artists working in very different time periods, mediums and agendas.

Artists included: Carl Andre, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Hans Bellmer, Dike Blair, Cecily Brown, Alexander Calder, Joseph Cornell, Marcel Duchamp, Hubert Duprat, Max Ernst, Hans Peter Feldmann, Urs Fischer, Lucio Fontana, Alberto Giacometti, John Giorno, Piero Golia, Douglas Gordon, Keith Haring, Jasper Johns, Paul Klee, Yves Klein, Franz Kline, René Magritte, Man Ray, Claes Oldenburg, Steven Parrino, Francis Picabia, Pablo Picasso, Richard Prince, Ed Ruscha, Kurt Schwitters, Charles Simonds, Elaine Sturtevant, Blair Thurman, Cy Twombly, Piotr Uklański, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann, Rachel Whiteread

Où finit le télescope, le microscope commence. Lequel des deux a la vue la plus grande?
—Victor Hugo

Gagosian est heureuse de présenter une exposition d’œuvres miniatures intitulée Micro Mania rassemblant près de soixante petits chefs d’œuvre issus d’un panorama d’artistes modernes et contemporains: Alexander Calder, Joseph Cornell, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Yves Klein, Jasper Johns, René Magritte, Francis Picabia, Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol, Cecily Brown, et Rachel Whiteread.

En conséquence, le Project Space a été transformé en un «cabinet de curiosités», au centre de la galerie une vitrine en verre contient ces toutes petites sculptures Pancakes and Sausages de Claes Oldenburg (1962), Untitled (Standing Mobile) d’Alexander Calder (1955), Concetto Spaziale de Lucio Fontana (1959) et Untitled de Joseph Cornell (1933)—qui mesure moins de 3 centimètres de diamètre-produisent un effet intégral. Parmi les œuvres intimes qui tapissent le mur, on peut admirer le Map de Jasper Johns (1960), Shéhérazade de René Magritte (1947), Peasant’s Leg de Marcel Duchamp (1904–05) et Untitled (Fireman Joke) de Richard Prince (1987).

Ces petites œuvres d’art semblent appartenir à un royaume à part, séparé, dans lequel les règles du monde physique n’ont plus lieu d’être. Leurs proportions sont semblables à celles d’un jouet d’enfant ou d’un bibelot—l’œuvre pouvant fonctionner comme le point de départ d’un récit confidentiel, et agir comme le représentant de la nostalgie et de la fantaisie. Puisant son inspiration dans l’exposition Think Tiny de l’artiste et poète Joe Brainard en 1975, ainsi que dans la nouvelle de science-fiction de Voltaire Micromegas—qui s’efforce de démontrer que l’importance ne doit pas se réduire à la taille—Micro Mania célèbre les qualités esthétiques et imaginatives inhérentes à l’art de la miniature dessinant des parallèles et des dialogues entre des artistes présentant des intérêts, des moyens d’expressions et des époques très différents.

Artistes inclus : Carl Andre, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Hans Bellmer, Dike Blair, Cecily Brown, Alexander Calder, Joseph Cornell, Marcel Duchamp, Hubert Duprat, Max Ernst, Hans Peter Feldmann, Urs Fischer, Lucio Fontana, Alberto Giacometti, John Giorno, Piero Golia, Douglas Gordon, Keith Haring, Jasper Johns, Paul Klee, Yves Klein, Franz Kline, René Magritte, Man Ray, Claes Oldenburg, Steven Parrino, Francis Picabia, Pablo Picasso, Richard Prince, Ed Ruscha, Kurt Schwitters, Charles Simonds, Elaine Sturtevant, Blair Thurman, Cy Twombly, Piotr Uklański, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann, Rachel Whiteread

Alexander Calder poster for McGovern, 1972, lithograph

The Art History of Presidential Campaign Posters

Against the backdrop of the 2020 US presidential election, historian Hal Wert takes us through the artistic and political evolution of American campaign posters, from their origin in 1844 to the present. In an interview with Quarterly editor Gillian Jakab, Wert highlights an array of landmark posters and the artists who made them.

Tom Eccles and Kiki Smith on Rachel Whiteread

In Conversation
Tom Eccles and Kiki Smith on Rachel Whiteread

On the occasion of Artist Spotlight: Rachel Whiteread, curator Tom Eccles and artist Kiki Smith speak about the work of Rachel Whiteread through the lens of their personal friendships with her. They discuss her public projects from the early 1990s to the present, the relationship between drawing and sculpture in her practice, and the way her works reveal the memories embedded in familiar everyday objects.

Jasper Johns, Untitled, 2011, acrylic over intaglio on paper mounted on Fred Siegenthaler “confetti” paper, 11 ¾ × 7 ¾ inches (29.8 × 19.7 cm)

The Generative Surface

Eileen Costello explores the oft-overlooked importance of paper choice to the mediums of drawing and printmaking, from the Renaissance through the present day.

Still from the video "In Conversation: Rachel Whiteread and Ann Gallagher"

In Conversation
Rachel Whiteread and Ann Gallagher

Rachel Whiteread speaks to Ann Gallagher about a new group of resin sculptures for an upcoming exhibition at Gagosian in London. They discuss the works’ emphasis on surface texture, light, and reflection.

Allen Midgette in front of the Chelsea Hotel, New York, 2000. Photo: Rita Barros

I’ll Be Your Mirror: Allen Midgette

Raymond Foye speaks with the actor who impersonated Andy Warhol during the great Warhol lecture hoax in the late 1960s. The two also discuss Midgette’s earlier film career in Italy and the difficulty of performing in a Warhol film.

The cover of Richard Prince: Cowboy, edited by Robert M. Rubin and published by Fulton Ryder and DelMonico Books | Prestel, New York, in 2020.

Richard Prince: Cowboy

On the occasion of the publication of Richard Prince: Cowboy, a major monograph on the artist’s preoccupation with the mythic American West, Luc Sante tracks the archetype through mass media, advertising, and the art of Richard Prince to illuminate the cowboy’s enduring appeal.