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Steven Parrino

Steven Parrino, 13 Shattered Panels (for Joey Ramone), 2001 13 standard panels of gypsum plaster board painted with black industrial lacquer, Dimensions variable

Steven Parrino, 13 Shattered Panels (for Joey Ramone), 2001

13 standard panels of gypsum plaster board painted with black industrial lacquer, Dimensions variable

Steven Parrino, Spinout Vortex, 2000 Vellum in matt board, 13 ¾ × 13 ½ inches (34.9 × 34.3 cm)

Steven Parrino, Spinout Vortex, 2000

Vellum in matt board, 13 ¾ × 13 ½ inches (34.9 × 34.3 cm)

Steven Parrino, Untitled, 1997 Enamel on canvas, 60 × 60 inches (152.4 × 152.4 cm)

Steven Parrino, Untitled, 1997

Enamel on canvas, 60 × 60 inches (152.4 × 152.4 cm)

Steven Parrino, Untitled, 1992 Sprayed engine enamel on vellum, 11 ½ × 10 inches (29.2 × 25.4 cm)

Steven Parrino, Untitled, 1992

Sprayed engine enamel on vellum, 11 ½ × 10 inches (29.2 × 25.4 cm)

Steven Parrino, Untitled, 1991 Sprayed enamel and pencil on vellum, 9 × 12 inches (22.9 × 30.5 cm)

Steven Parrino, Untitled, 1991

Sprayed enamel and pencil on vellum, 9 × 12 inches (22.9 × 30.5 cm)

Steven Parrino, Untitled, 1991 Sprayed enamel, pencil on vellum, 9 × 12 inches (22.9 × 30.5 cm)

Steven Parrino, Untitled, 1991

Sprayed enamel, pencil on vellum, 9 × 12 inches (22.9 × 30.5 cm)

About

Most are afraid of total freedom, of nothingness, of life. You try to control everything, but nature is uncontrollable. It doesn’t matter how you express yourself (words, image, electric guitar), what matters is that you have something to express. 
—Steven Parrino

Steven Parrino (1958–2005) is best known for his signature “misshaped” monochromes with slashed, torn, or twisted canvases. A pioneer in performance and video art, he approached all of his work with a radicalism born out of a deep understanding of the history of painting and the avant-garde.

Parrino was born in New York and grew up on Long Island. He earned an Associate in Applied Science degree from the State University of New York at Farmingdale in 1979 and a BFA from the New School, New York, in 1982. In the late 1970s Parrino began staging impromptu performances, including: Fire Door (1979), wherein he set off the fire alarm of a building and escaped via the fire exit; Electric Guitar (1979), fifteen minutes of feedback played at high volume; and Disruption (1981), in which he smashed a TV set with a sledgehammer. Because they were improvised, most of these were not well-documented, yet their anarchic energy was made palpable in Parrino’s later paintings and three-dimensional works.

In 1984 Parrino’s paintings were shown at Gallery Nature Morte in New York’s East Village, increasing his visibility in the art world. Due to his nihilistic approach to painting, he was considered by some to be part of a strain of postmodern art called Neo-Geo, or neo-geometric conceptualism. Neo-Geo artists, such as Peter Halley, Jeff Koons, and Olivier Mosset, criticized the mechanization and commercialism of the modern world. Bob Nickas included Parrino’s work and that of several Neo-Geo artists in a group exhibition titled The Art of the Real, at Galerie Pierre Huber, Geneva, in 1987. The title was borrowed from the landmark 1968 exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, which featured works by Donald Judd, Ellsworth Kelly, Barnett Newman, Ad Reinhardt, Robert Smithson, and Frank Stella, among others. MoMA’s exhibition gathered artists whose work expressed the “real” as a set of facts rather than symbols. Nickas, with his show, posited that the Neo-Geo artists were expanding this project twenty years later.

Never completely comfortable with the “Neo-Geo” label, Parrino derived his work from his deep art-historical engagement and love of Pop iconography, and from the subversive counterculture of the Hell’s Angels, the occult, and the No Wave and punk rock movements. Hells Angels (1985) is a literal application of the formalist push-pull theory, wherein Parrino physically exercised violence upon the canvas. Frank Stella’s Cat (1992) plays with the technique Stella used in his black paintings, with their unpainted stripes, by letting the unprimed canvas intrude within the picture plane as a network of folds. And Death in America #2 (2003) echoes Andy Warhol’s Death and Disaster series (1962–63), providing a glimpse of the dark and nightmarish underbelly of the American Dream.

Parrino’s last solo exhibition during his lifetime took place at Team Gallery, New York, in 2004. It was titled Plan 9 after Ed Wood’s 1959 film Plan 9 from Outer Space, a story of the living dead. Included in the exhibition was The Chaotic Painting (2004), in which space seems to push outward, to come from elsewhere, echoing Robert Smithson’s conflation of pictorial and cosmic space. Questioning the painted canvas through piercing, tearing, and twisting it off the stretcher, Parrino redefined pictorial possibilities by blurring boundaries between formalism and counterculture.

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Art Fair

Art Basel Unlimited
Edgar Cleijne and Ellen Gallagher, Duane Hanson, Steven Parrino, Giuseppe Penone, Tom Wesselmann

June 13–16, 2019, hall 1.1
Messe Basel
www.artbasel.com

Gagosian is pleased to announce that works by Edgar Cleijne and Ellen Gallagher, Duane Hanson, Steven Parrino, Giuseppe Penone, and Tom Wesselmann have been selected for Art Basel Unlimited 2019, curated by Gianni Jetzer. Launched in 2000, Unlimited is an exhibition platform for exciting large-scale works that transcend the limits of the standard art fair booth. The five artworks are:

Edgar Cleijne and Ellen Gallagher, Highway Gothic, 2017–19
Duane Hanson, Lunchbreak, 1989
Steven Parrino, 13 Shattered Panels (for Joey Ramone), 2001
Giuseppe Penone, Cedro di Versailles (Cedar of Versailles), 2000–03
Tom Wesselmann, Still Life #60, 1973

To receive a PDF with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at artbasel.com.

Left: Steven Parrino, Untitled, 2004 (detail) © Steven Parrino, courtesy Parrino Family Estate. Right: John Chamberlain, GOOSECAKEWALK, 2009 (detail) © 2019 Fairweather & Fairweather LTD/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Art Fair

Frieze New York

May 2–5, 2019, booth C26
Randall’s Island Park, New York
frieze.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in Frieze New York 2019, with a booth dedicated to the work of John Chamberlain and Steven Parrino. The included works highlight the ways in which Chamberlain and Parrino explored the act of folding and compressing materials. Through twisting, bending, or crushing, both artists variously disrupted the conventional rectilinear plane.

To receive a PDF with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at frieze.com/fairs.

Download the full press release (PDF)

Left: Steven Parrino, Untitled, 2004 (detail) © Steven Parrino, courtesy Parrino Family Estate. Right: John Chamberlain, GOOSECAKEWALK, 2009 (detail) © 2019 Fairweather & Fairweather LTD/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Damien Hirst, Truffle, 2016 © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2018

Art Fair

artgenève

January 31–February 3, 2019, booth B19
Palexpo, Geneva
www.artgeneve.ch

Gagosian is pleased to participate in artgenève 2019, with modern and contemporary artworks by Georg Baselitz, Chris Burden, Urs Fischer, Romuald Hazoumè, Damien Hirst, Sally Mann, Olivier Mosset, Steven Parrino, Giuseppe Penone, Richard Serra, Rudolf Stingel, Spencer Sweeney, Mark Tansey, Tatiana Trouvé, Tom Wesselmann, Franz West, and others.

To receive a PDF with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at artgeneve.ch. To preview our booth, go to artsy.net.

Download the full press release in English or French

Damien Hirst, Truffle, 2016 © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2018

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Museum Exhibitions

Douglas Gordon, going out, 2005 © Studio lost but found and VG Bild-Kunst 2018. Photo by Axel Schneider

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I Am a Problem

September 23, 2017–February 18, 2018
MMK 2, Frankfurt
mmk-frankfurt.de

A gloomy and at the same time provoking parallel world unfolds in the exhibition space, in which works from the Museum für Moderne Kunst’s collection become protagonists of a narrative and enter into a dialogue with one another. The starting point for the staging is a myth about Maria Callas (1923–1977). Work by Douglas Gordon, Bruce Nauman, Steven Parrino, Taryn Simon, and Andy Warhol is included.

Douglas Gordon, going out, 2005 © Studio lost but found and VG Bild-Kunst 2018. Photo by Axel Schneider

Photo by Axel Schneider

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Primary Structures
Masterworks of Minimal Art

February 22–August 13, 2017
MMK2, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt am Main
mmk-frankfurt.de

The Minimal art current emerged in the US in the early 1960s, its exponents striving in their works for objectiveness, logic, and industrial production without artistic signature. The exhibition investigates the international impact of the influential Minimal art movement from the ’60s to the present. This show includes works by Richard Artschwager, Walter De Maria, Bruce Nauman, Steven Parrino, and Richard Serra.

Photo by Axel Schneider

Steven Parrino, Dancing on Graves, 1999. Photo by Zarko Vijatovic

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Steven Parrino
Dancing on Graves

April 5–June 16, 2017
The Power Station, Dallas
powerstationdallas.com

Engaging in post-punk abstraction, the physicality of Parrino’s work highlights iconoclasts and anti-culture, deviants and superheroes alongside the trajectory of Minimalism. Dancing on Graves is Parrino’s first institutional show in the US. The museum is presenting painting, sculpture, video, and works on paper.

Steven Parrino, Dancing on Graves, 1999. Photo by Zarko Vijatovic

Press

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