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Extended through June 30, 2018

About Photography

April 24–June 30, 2018
San Francisco

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Piero Golia, © Adam McEwen, © Florian Maier-Aichen. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Piero Golia, © Adam McEwen, © Florian Maier-Aichen. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Ed Ruscha, © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Ed Ruscha, © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Dike Blair, © Sally Mann, © Nicola Del Roscio Foundation. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Dike Blair, © Sally Mann, © Nicola Del Roscio Foundation. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © 2018 Cindy Sherman, © Taryn Simon. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © 2018 Cindy Sherman, © Taryn Simon. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view Artwork © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view

Artwork © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view Artwork © 2018 Chris Burden/Licensed by The Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view

Artwork © 2018 Chris Burden/Licensed by The Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view with Andy Warhol, Screen Tests, 1964–66 (1964–66) Artwork © 2018 The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view with Andy Warhol, Screen Tests, 1964–66 (1964–66)

Artwork © 2018 The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view with Andy Warhol, Screen Tests, 1964–66 (1964–66) Artwork © 2018 The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view with Andy Warhol, Screen Tests, 1964–66 (1964–66)

Artwork © 2018 The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view with Andy Warhol, Screen Tests, 1964–66 (1964–66) Artwork © 2018 The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Installation view with Andy Warhol, Screen Tests, 1964–66 (1964–66)

Artwork © 2018 The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved. Photo: Johnna Arnold

Works Exhibited

Douglas Gordon, Monster Reborn, 2002 Transmounted chromogenic print, 32 × 48 inches (81.3 × 121.9 cm), edition of 11 + 3 AP© Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018

Douglas Gordon, Monster Reborn, 2002

Transmounted chromogenic print, 32 × 48 inches (81.3 × 121.9 cm), edition of 11 + 3 AP
© Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018

Duane Hanson, Man with Camera, 1991–92 Polychromed bronze and mixed media, 49 × 38 × 34 inches (124.5 × 96.5 × 86.4 cm), 1 of 3 unique versions© Duane Hanson. Photo: Rob McKeever

Duane Hanson, Man with Camera, 1991–92

Polychromed bronze and mixed media, 49 × 38 × 34 inches (124.5 × 96.5 × 86.4 cm), 1 of 3 unique versions
© Duane Hanson. Photo: Rob McKeever

Cindy Sherman, Untitled Film Still #60, 1980 Gelatin silver print, 40 × 30 inches (101.6 × 76.2 cm)© 2018 Cindy Sherman. Photo: courtesy the artist and Metro Pictures, New York

Cindy Sherman, Untitled Film Still #60, 1980

Gelatin silver print, 40 × 30 inches (101.6 × 76.2 cm)
© 2018 Cindy Sherman. Photo: courtesy the artist and Metro Pictures, New York

Chris Burden, Deluxe Photo Book 1971–73, 1974 Gelatin silver prints, chromogenic prints, and typewritten note in loose-leaf binder with hand-painted cover, 12 x 12 x 3 inches (30.5 x 30.5 x 7.6 cm), edition of 50© Chris Burden/Licensed by The Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Chris Burden, Deluxe Photo Book 1971–73, 1974

Gelatin silver prints, chromogenic prints, and typewritten note in loose-leaf binder with hand-painted cover, 12 x 12 x 3 inches (30.5 x 30.5 x 7.6 cm), edition of 50
© Chris Burden/Licensed by The Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Adam McEwen, Untitled (Bret), 2011 Chromogenic print, 40 × 28 inches (101.6 × 71.1 cm), edition of 3 + 2 AP© Adam McEwen

Adam McEwen, Untitled (Bret), 2011

Chromogenic print, 40 × 28 inches (101.6 × 71.1 cm), edition of 3 + 2 AP
© Adam McEwen

About

Gagosian is pleased to present About Photography, an exhibition by artists, modern and contemporary, who have exhibited with the gallery over the past four decades.

About Photography explores the ways in which artists use photography as a medium, a means to an end, and a catalyst for other art forms. From Andy Warhol to Richard Prince, these artists open up the question of what it means to utilize the photographic medium for representation, as well as in the creation of form. As intellectual challenges continue to unfold, photography pervades not only all other artistic genres, but our every moment as well, a phenomenon that has irrevocably changed the nature of art itself.

The exhibition’s only sculpture, Duane Hanson’s Man with Camera (1991–92), takes center stage: a figure perched on a folding chair poises his camera to take a photograph. Celebrated for their startling realism, Hanson’s figures and the “snapshot of America” that they constitute take on new meaning in a photographic context. Nearby, Andy Warhol’s Screen Test of Edie Sedgwick (1965) is projected on the entrance wall. Richard Avedon’s portraits of Louis Armstrong (1955), Bob Dylan (1963), Malcolm X (1963), and members of Warhol’s Factory (1969–75) create an interlocking narrative about photography and society, contrasting with both the aesthetics and implications of Hanson’s figure.

Fifty years after Diane Arbus began shooting her unsettling black-and-white portraits of ordinary Americans on a medium-format Rolleiflex, producing distinctive, square photographs, Richard Prince’s Untitled (portrait) (2015) borrows the characteristic text and cropping of an Instagram post. An avid documenter and collector of American subcultures, Prince uses mass-media images to redefine concepts of ownership and authorship. Here, his examination of the contemporary channels and distribution of the photograph stands in stark contrast to Arbus’s iconic portraits, including Identical Twins, Roselle, N.J. (1966).

While Ed Ruscha’s deadpan series Vacant Lots (1970–2003) memorializes Los Angeles’s vernacular architecture, now largely overbuilt, the dissonance between nature and the incursion of commerce and popular culture is made evident in Andreas Gursky’s SH II (2014), in which a superhero sits alone in a desolate landscape.

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From the Quarterly

Deluxe Photo Book

Deluxe Photo Book

Sydney Stutterheim discusses Chris Burden’s Deluxe Photo Book 1971–73 on the occasion of its inclusion in About Photography at Gagosian San Francisco.

Who is choreographing whom?

Who is choreographing whom?

PLAY, currently on view at Gagosian on West 21st Street in New York, is a work by Urs Fischer in which nine office chairs move through the gallery and interact with visitors. Artist and choreographer Madeline Hollander worked with Fischer and a team of programmers and animators to create various gestures, movements, and behavior sequences for the chairs. Gagosian’s Angela Brown sat down to talk with Hollander about this process.

Urs Fischer: Things

Urs Fischer: Things

In midtown Manhattan, a new sculpture by Urs Fischer, entitled Things, was debuted in May 2018. Fischer and international curator, Francesco Bonami, discuss this unique exhibition with the Gagosian Quarterly.

Urs Fischer: Sotatsu

Urs Fischer: Sotatsu

Urs Fischer and Francesco Bonami sat down with the Gagosian Quarterly to discuss Sōtatsu, a new painting in nine parts.

Cy Twombly: In Beauty it is finished

Cy Twombly: In Beauty it is finished

Mark Francis, director of the exhibition Cy Twombly: In Beauty it is finished, Drawings 1951–2008, describes the impetus for this expansive presentation, the source for its title, and details the stories of some of the works on view.

Cy Twombly: Coronation of Sesostris

Cy Twombly: Coronation of Sesostris

Cy Twombly’s Coronation of Sesostris (2000) receives a closer look by Gagosian Director, Mark Francis. In this video, he discusses the history of the work, the myths and poetry embedded within it, and considers its lasting impact.