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Gagosian Quarterly

July 11, 2019

Gagosian Quarterly Talks

Desert Painters of Australia

To coincide with Desert Painters of Australia, an exhibition of contemporary Indigenous Australian art at Gagosian, 976 Madison Avenue, New York, the gallery hosted a conversation between leading authorities Fred Myers, Silver Professor of Anthropology at New York University, and Henry Skerritt, Curator of Indigenous Arts of Australia at the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia, and Margo Smith AM, director of the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection.

Gagosian Quarterly Talks: Desert Painters of Australia, Gagosian, 976 Madison Avenue, New York, May 21, 2019; video: Pushpin Films; introduction: Louise Neri

Desert Painters of Australia: Works from the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia and the Collection of Steve Martin and Anne Stringfield, Gagosian, New York, May 3–July 3, 2019; Desert Painters of Australia Part II: With Works from the Collection of Steve Martin and Anne Stringfield, Gagosian, Beverly Hills, July 26–September 6, 2019

Jenny Saville’s Prism (2020) on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly magazine.

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Winter 2020

The Winter 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Jenny Saville’s Prism (2020) on its cover.

Dancer on Soho roof in performance "Roof Piece," New York, 1973

Foray Forêt: Trisha Brown’s Choreographed Landscapes

On the occasion of the Trisha Brown Dance Company’s fiftieth anniversary, Hendel Teicher examines the legendary choreographer’s work through a biographical lens.

Jeff Wall, Dead Troops Talk (a vision after an ambush of a Red Army Patrol, near Moqor, Afghanistan, winter 1986), 1992, transparency in lightbox, 90 ⅛ × 164 ⅛ inches (229 × 417 cm)

Death Valley ’89: Jeff Wall vs. Photography

Daniel Spaulding considers formal and technical developments in the photographer’s work against the background of global shifts of power and politics, specifically the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.

Ewa Juszkiewicz, Untitled (after Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun), 2020, oil on canvas, 63 × 47 ¼ inches (160 × 120 cm)

Ewa Juszkiewicz

Lisa Small, senior curator of European art at the Brooklyn Museum, considers the historical precedents for Ewa Juszkiewicz’s painting practice.

Jia Aili working on the painting Everest (2020) in his studio in Beijing

Jia Aili: Before the Images Are Formed

Curator Shen Qilan speaks with the artist about his latest works.

Mercedes Matter with students at the New York Studio School. Photo: Herbert Matter, courtesy the Department of Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries

Game Changer
Mercedes Matter

Lauren Mahony and Michael Tcheyan pay homage to the founder of the New York Studio School.

Joe Bradley’s studio, New York, 2018

Work in Progress
Joe Bradley

With preparations underway for his 2018 exhibition at Gagosian in London, Phyllis Tuchman visited the artist’s studio in Long Island City, New York, to learn more about this new body of work.

Jia Aili studio 2017–18. Photo: Jia Aili.

Jia Aili: Human Nature

The artist speaks with the Quarterly about interrogating perceptions, questioning illusions, and the primacy of intuition.

The cover of Richard Prince: Cowboy, edited by Robert M. Rubin and published by Fulton Ryder and DelMonico Books | Prestel, New York, in 2020.

Richard Prince: Cowboy

On the occasion of the publication of Richard Prince: Cowboy, a major monograph on the artist’s preoccupation with the mythic American West, Luc Sante tracks the archetype through mass media, advertising, and the art of Richard Prince to illuminate the cowboy’s enduring appeal.

Henri Matisse, The Music Lesson, 1917, oil on canvas, domestic interior scene of people in the livingroom at the piano, reading chair, and window

Lockdown: Henri Matisse’s Domestic Interiors

John Elderfield reexamines Matisse’s Piano Lesson (1916) and Music Lesson (1917), considering the works’ depictions of domestic space during the tumult of World War I.

Robert De Niro in Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman (2019). Photo: courtesy Netflix

The Last Gangster Show

Carlos Valladares explores the gangster film genre, tracing the conventions and evolutions in the form from the exuberance of Raoul Walsh’s The Roaring Twenties (1939) to the heavy silence of Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman (2019).

A portrait of LL Cool J, Brooklyn, New York, 1991, but Anton Corbijn

Anton Corbijn

Natasha Prince interviews the Dutch photographer and filmmaker about his relationships with musicians and gets the backstory on some of his most legendary images. Ivan Shaw puts Corbijn’s practice and aesthetic innovations into context.