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Taryn Simon, Cutaways, 2012 © Taryn Simon

Video

Taryn Simon
Cutaways

Taryn Simon’s Cutaways (2012) is available online from June 23 through July 22 as part of Artist Spotlight: Taryn Simon. At the close of the taping of a video interview for Prime Time Russia in Moscow, Simon was asked to sit in silence and stare at the newscasters for several minutes so that the producers could gather additional footage for the editing process. Cutaways presents this footage as an autonomous work.

Taryn Simon, Cutaways, 2012 © Taryn Simon

Taryn Simon: A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I–XVIII (2nd ed. New York: Gagosian Gallery; London: Wilson Center for Photography, 2012)

Online Reading

Homi K. Bhabha
Beyond Photography

Simon’s case studies are meditations on the touching of opposites—order and disorder, civility and barbarism, violence and aspiration—in the inscription of the human condition.
—Homi K. Bhabha

In his essay “Beyond Photography,” Homi K. Bhabha elaborates on the themes, structures, and stories that comprise Taryn Simon’s A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I–XVIII (2008–11), a collection that is at once cohesive and arbitrary, mapping the relationships among chance, blood, and other components of fate. The essay is available for online reading from June 23 through August 31 as part of Artist Spotlight: Taryn Simon.

Taryn Simon: A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I–XVIII (2nd ed. New York: Gagosian Gallery; London: Wilson Center for Photography, 2012)

Taryn Simon: An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar (3rd ed. Ostfildern, Germany: Hatje Cantz, 2013)

Online Reading

Salman Rushdie
Foreword to “An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar”

Democracy needs visibility, accountability, light. It is in the unseen darkness that unsavoury things huddle and grow.
—Salman Rushdie

Salman Rushdie discusses Taryn Simon’s An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar, which depicts objects, sites, and spaces that are integral to America’s foundation, mythology, and daily operations but that remain inaccessible or unknown. His text is available for online reading from June 23 through August 31 as part of Artist Spotlight: Taryn Simon.

Taryn Simon: An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar (3rd ed. Ostfildern, Germany: Hatje Cantz, 2013)

Taryn Simon: Rear Views, a Star-forming Nebula, and the Office of Foreign Propaganda (London: Tate Publishing, 2015)

Online Reading

Philip Tinari
Taryn Simon in China

In the end, what interests me most in this story is not the absoluteness of censorship but rather the way this particular system provides a set of constraints which, like most constraints, can be short-circuited to different effect. Certain panels may not have entered China, but the images and information they contain could not be kept out.
—Philip Tinari

Philip Tinari, director of the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art (UCCA), describes a 2013–14 presentation of Taryn Simon’s A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I–XVIII at UCCA Beijing. This text is available for online reading from June 23 through August 31 as part of Artist Spotlight: Taryn Simon.

Taryn Simon: Rear Views, a Star-forming Nebula, and the Office of Foreign Propaganda (London: Tate Publishing, 2015)

Left: Taryn Simon. Photo: © Taryn Simon. Right: Teju Cole. Photo: Maggie Janik

In Conversation

Taryn Simon
Teju Cole

Monday, March 29, 2021, 7pm EDT

Join Taryn Simon and writer and photographer Teju Cole as they reflect on Simon’s artistic practice and creative process. An award-winning novelist, Cole encountered Simon’s exhibition Paperwork and the Will of Capital in a Brussels gallery on the eve of the 2016 United States presidential election. When the results of that election left him shocked and in despair, Cole found himself temporarily unable to write. Simon’s art, however, continued to inform his thinking and writing process. He revisited her work with the essay “Capital, Diplomacy and Carnations” for the New York Times Magazine—a look at Simon’s masterful take on “powerful forces in the world that shape our day-to-day realities.” A live question-and-answer session will follow the talk, which is hosted by the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio. To attend the online event, register at osu.edu.

Left: Taryn Simon. Photo: © Taryn Simon. Right: Teju Cole. Photo: Maggie Janik

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Capri 53.57), 2020 © Mark Grotjahn

Support

The Kitchen
Ice and Fire: A Benefit Exhibition in Three Parts

October 15, 2020–March 23, 2021

The benefit exhibition Ice and Fire features works by more than forty artists who have enduring relationships with the Kitchen in New York. Installed within the organization’s three-story space in Chelsea, which is currently closed due to the global pandemic, the three-part exhibition is viewable online. Proceeds from sales will go toward a planned renovation on the occasion of the Kitchen’s fiftieth anniversary, ensuring that the nonprofit space will remain a platform for artistic experimentation in its historic and beloved building. Work by Cecily Brown, Roe Ethridge, Mark Grotjahn, Alex Israel, Ed Ruscha, Taryn Simon, Mary Weatherford, and Christopher Wool is included.

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Capri 53.57), 2020 © Mark Grotjahn

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Announcements

View of Taryn Simon’s The Pipes (2016–21) prior to installation at MASS MoCA, North Adams, Massachusetts. Artwork © Taryn Simon. Photo: Will McLaughlin, courtesy MASS MoCA

Permanent Installation

Taryn Simon
The Pipes

Taryn Simon’s large-scale outdoor sculpture The Pipes (2016–21) will be on long-term view at MASS MoCA, in North Adams, Massachusetts, starting on June 26, 2021. What began as an oversize concrete instrument for a cacophony of global mourning in Simon’s work An Occupation of Loss (2016) will be populated by the sounds, collective call-and-response, and movements of a living public. The eleven structures that make up the installation—which Simon designed in collaboration with Shohei Shigematsu of the architecture firm OMA—offer the public an immersive experience and a sacred space for reflection, impromptu performance, and stargazing.

View of Taryn Simon’s The Pipes (2016–21) prior to installation at MASS MoCA, North Adams, Massachusetts. Artwork © Taryn Simon. Photo: Will McLaughlin, courtesy MASS MoCA

Still from “Taryn Simon on ‘Black Square’”

Video

Taryn Simon on “Black Square”

In this video produced by Artforum, Taryn Simon discusses her Black Square series (2006–), an ongoing project in which she photographs objects, documents, and individuals against a black field of precisely the same dimensions as Kazimir Malevich’s 1915 Suprematist work of the same name. Simon also speaks about the most recent addition to the series, Black Square XXIV (2020)—a portrait of Joe Biden, whom she photographed at the White House during the first term of his vice presidency, in 2009. Speaking in the days leading up to the 2020 US presidential election, she notes how this still-unfolding event had changed and would continue to change the ways we might view this image.

Still from “Taryn Simon on ‘Black Square’”

Taryn Simon and Aaron Swartz, Border, 9/30/16, 12:19pm (Eastern Standard Time), Image Atlas, 2012, website view

Award and Talk

Taryn Simon

May 18–21, 2017
Photo London, Somerset House
www.photolondon.org

Photo London has selected Taryn Simon as its Master of Photography 2017. Simon will present Image Atlas, a live online digital archive that she developed in collaboration with programmer Aaron Swartz. Simon will be in conversation with James Lingwood, codirector of Artangel, at Photo London’s Talks Program on Thursday, May 18, 1:00–2:20pm, Somerset House. 

Concurrently, Gagosian Britannia Street will present selected works by Simon. Works from An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar in the Tate’s permanent collection remain on view at Tate Modern through December 1, 2017.

Taryn Simon and Aaron Swartz, Border, 9/30/16, 12:19pm (Eastern Standard Time), Image Atlas, 2012, website view

Photo: David Pinzer

Award

Taryn Simon

Free Arts NYC honors Taryn Simon at the eighteenth annual art auction on April 26, 2017. Simon will be working with Free Arts youth on a project related to her body of work, The Picture Collection. Free Arts NYC is a non-profit organization dedicated to empowering underserved youth through art and mentoring programs that develop their creativity, confidence, and skills to succeed.

Photo: David Pinzer

Still from “Taryn Simon Interview: Where the Secret Goes”

Video

Taryn Simon
Where the Secret Goes

In this video produced by the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Humlebaek, Denmark, Taryn Simon speaks about what drives her as an artist and about the research-based working process through which she gained access to and documented places normally inaccessible to the public for An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar (2007). Following September 11, 2001, as the American government and media sought hidden sites beyond US borders, Simon explains, she looked inside her own country, examining the divide between privileged and public access—and the psychological and bureaucratic barriers—in domains including religion, security, governance, entertainment, and law.

Still from “Taryn Simon Interview: Where the Secret Goes”

Gagosian App for iPad

New Release

Gagosian App for iPad
Issue 4

Gagosian announces the release of issue 4 of the Gagosian App for iPad on July 13, 2013. Artists featured in this issue include Georg Baselitz, Piero Manzoni, Robert Rauschenberg, Nancy Rubins, Thomas Ruff, Taryn Simon, and Cy Twombly.

In issue 4 we feature an illustrated “pop-up” biography of Georg Baselitz, show Piero Manzoni’s Azimuth magazines digitized with full English translations for the first time, offer an endless “art board” of works from the exhibition The Private Collection of Robert Rauschenberg, including historical and biographical information on more than seventy-six artists. We also show a comprehensive overview of Nancy Rubins’s monumental public sculptures made from industrial objects, and give you a look at Thomas Ruff’s stereoscopic ma.r.s. photographs in 3-D. We invite you to interact with multimedia highlights from Taryn Simon’s four major bodies of work, curated by the artist, and explore Cy Twombly’s final paintings with a photographic and audio tribute to the artist by Sally Mann.

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Museum Exhibitions

Taryn Simon, Press XL, from the series Paperwork and the Will of Capital, 2015, Brooklyn Museum, New York © Taryn Simon

On View

The Slipstream
Reflection, Resilience, and Resistance in the Art of Our Time

Through March 20, 2022
Brooklyn Museum, New York
www.brooklynmuseum.org

The Slipstream draws examples from Brooklyn Museum’s contemporary art collection to contemplate the profound disruption that occurred in 2020. Borrowing its title from an aeronautical term that refers to the pull of the current that is left in the wake of a large and powerful object, the exhibition examines the placement and displacement of power that runs through American history and continues today. The show features more than sixty works by multiple generations of artists from the 1960s to the present day, including Titus Kaphar and Taryn Simon.

Taryn Simon, Press XL, from the series Paperwork and the Will of Capital, 2015, Brooklyn Museum, New York © Taryn Simon

Installation view, Taryn Simon: The Color of a Flea’s Eye: The Picture Collection, New York Public Library, 2020. Artwork © Taryn Simon. Photo: Rob McKeever

On View

Taryn Simon
The Color of a Flea’s Eye: The Picture Collection

Through May 15, 2022
New York Public Library
www.nypl.org

A project nine years in the making, The Color of a Flea’s Eye foregrounds the New York Public Library’s Picture Collection, whose storied images have been available, for more than a century, for the public to sift through in search of visual references of every conceivable kind. Intrigued by the Picture Collection since childhood, in 2012 Taryn Simon embarked on a study of its underlying patterns, codes, and orders. Her photography of its contents reveals it to be an inadvertent recorder of changing social mores, disclosing latent fault lines of power, race, and gender.

Installation view, Taryn Simon: The Color of a Flea’s Eye: The Picture Collection, New York Public Library, 2020. Artwork © Taryn Simon. Photo: Rob McKeever

Taryn Simon and Aaron Swartz, Image Atlas (2012), installation view, C/O Berlin Foundation © Taryn Simon. Photo: David von Becker

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Taryn Simon in
Send Me an Image: From Postcards to Social Media

May 29–September 2, 2021
C/O Berlin Foundation
co-berlin.org

This exhibition considers photography’s transformation from an illustrative medium to one of society’s most significant means of communicating today. The photographs and projects on view illuminate phenomena such as censorship, surveillance, and algorithmic regulation, which affect human activities in our data-driven era. Work by Taryn Simon is included.

Taryn Simon and Aaron Swartz, Image Atlas (2012), installation view, C/O Berlin Foundation © Taryn Simon. Photo: David von Becker

Taryn Simon, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Contraband Room, John F. Kennedy International Airport, Queens, New York, 2007, from the series An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar, 2007 © Taryn Simon

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Taryn Simon in
Future Food: Essen für die Welt von morgen

May 31–August 28, 2021
Deutsches Hygiene-Museum, Dresden, Germany
www.dhmd.de

This exhibition, whose title translates to Future Food: What Will We Eat Tomorrow?, investigates the political, ethical, and cultural significance of eating. This interdisciplinary show features works of contemporary art that address one of the most urgent questions of our time: “How will we—and can we—feed ourselves in the future?” Work by Taryn Simon is included.

Taryn Simon, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Contraband Room, John F. Kennedy International Airport, Queens, New York, 2007, from the series An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar, 2007 © Taryn Simon

Installation view, Taryn Simon: An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark, April 21–May 30, 2021. Artwork © Taryn Simon

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Taryn Simon
An American Index

April 21–May 30, 2021
Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark
louisiana.dk

The Louisiana Museum of Modern Art is presenting the entirety of Taryn Simon’s photographic series An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar (2007), recently acquired for its collection. Documenting in photography and text objects, sites, and spaces that remain inaccessible or unknown to the American public, this unsettling body of work presents a rare portrait of the United States through the lenses of science, religion, medicine, entertainment, security, and politics.

Installation view, Taryn Simon: An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark, April 21–May 30, 2021. Artwork © Taryn Simon

Taryn Simon, Chapter XVIII, from the series A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I–XVIII, 2008–11 © Taryn Simon

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Taryn Simon in
Dear Truth: Documentary Strategies in Contemporary Photography

February 5–May 2, 2021
Hasselblad Foundation, Gothenburg, Sweden
www.hasselbladfoundation.org

This exhibition explores how nine contemporary artists approach ideas of truth, facts, and objectivity, and how they, guided by ethical reflections, make urgent sociopolitical matters visible in their work. Their projects address some of the most challenging issues of our time: human rights, the environment, democracy, migration, technology, and violence. The truth plays a central role in their practices, not as an authoritarian or neutral vision, but as a starting point for socially engaged contemporary art. Work by Taryn Simon is included.

Taryn Simon, Chapter XVIII, from the series A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I–XVIII, 2008–11 © Taryn Simon

Taryn Simon, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Contraband Room, John F. Kennedy International Airport, Queens, New York, 2007, from the series An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar, 2007 © Taryn Simon

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Taryn Simon in
Spaces of No Control

October 1, 2020–February 19, 2021
Austrian Cultural Forum New York
www.acfny.org

Spaces of No Control is an international group exhibition that explores the notions of the modern city and its signifying dystopias of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This multifaceted show unites contemporary artists based in Austria and the United States to comment on current definitions of citizenship and public space. Work by Taryn Simon is included.

Taryn Simon, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Contraband Room, John F. Kennedy International Airport, Queens, New York, 2007, from the series An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar, 2007 © Taryn Simon

Taryn Simon, Sausages (prohibited), 2010, from the series Contraband, 2010 © Taryn Simon

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Terminal

August 13, 2020–February 14, 2021
City Gallery Wellington, New Zealand
citygallery.org.nz

Terminal is an exhibition of international art made about the airport, not for it. The exhibiting artists variously address the airport as site, form, or symbol—often by subverting its iconography and processes, or by tackling its history and politics. Work by Andreas Gursky and Taryn Simon is included.

Taryn Simon, Sausages (prohibited), 2010, from the series Contraband, 2010 © Taryn Simon

Taryn Simon, Chapter XIV, 2011, from the series A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I–XVIII, 2008–11 © Taryn Simon

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Taryn Simon in
Measure Your Existence

February 7, 2020–January 24, 2021
Rubin Museum of Art, New York
rubinmuseum.org

Measure Your Existence questions and expands the Buddhist concept of impermanence through artworks by six contemporary artists who explore duration, survival, memory, fate, history, loss, disappearance, and reappearance. Work by Taryn Simon is included.

Taryn Simon, Chapter XIV, 2011, from the series A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I–XVIII, 2008–11 © Taryn Simon

Taryn Simon, Transatlantic Sub-Marine Cables Reaching Land, VSNL International, Avon, New Jersey, 2006–07, from the series An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar, 2007 © Taryn Simon

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Taryn Simon in
We Never Sleep

September 24, 2020–January 10, 2021
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, Germany
www.schirn.de

This exhibition explores the “golden age” of espionage during the Cold War in the context of media super-exposure through the works of more than forty international artists. On view are a multitude of artistic strategies and unexpected objects: Paintings, photographs, videos, sculptures, and installations address the topic from a contemporary perspective. The works in the show touch on aspects of spy culture such as surveillance, paranoia, conspiracy, threat, camouflage, cryptography, manipulation, and propaganda. Work by Taryn Simon is included.

Taryn Simon, Transatlantic Sub-Marine Cables Reaching Land, VSNL International, Avon, New Jersey, 2006–07, from the series An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar, 2007 © Taryn Simon

Adriana Varejão, Horto Jerked-Beef Ruin (diptych), 2001 © Adriana Varejão

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Time for Outrage!
Art in Times of Social Anger

October 29, 2020–January 10, 2021
Kunstpalast Düsseldorf, Germany
www.kunstpalast.de

Based on a 2010 manifesto of the same title by former French resistance fighter Stéphane Hessel, the exhibition Time for Outrage! brought together more than forty international artists who visualize, reflect on, and comment on various facets of anger and rage in our society during this era of political turmoil and democratic crisis. Work by Taryn Simon and Adriana Varejão was included.

Adriana Varejão, Horto Jerked-Beef Ruin (diptych), 2001 © Adriana Varejão

Photo © Taryn Simon

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Taryn Simon
Assembled Audience

September 26–November 20, 2020
Wexner Center for the Arts, Ohio State University, Columbus
wexarts.org

Taryn Simon’s Assembled Audience (2018) draws on the notion of engineered applause, gathering individuals with varying political, corporate, and ideological allegiances into a single crowd. Simon assimilated recordings of single attendees applauding at local concerts, sporting events, and political rallies at three of the largest venues in the capital city of the bellwether state of Ohio. Her experiential installation wholly immerses the visitor in a darkened space punctuated only by the sound of randomized individual applause tracks; the same crowd never comes together twice. Presented for the first time in the city of its creation, Assembled Audience proves prescient in the isolation that it forecasted as these same gathering spaces, once crowd-filled, are now quieted by covid-19, the spaces respectively repurposed for eviction trials, police trainings, and a field hospital.

Photo © Taryn Simon

See all Museum Exhibitions for Taryn Simon