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Nam June Paik, Edited for Television, 1975 (still) © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: courtesy Electronic Arts Intermix

Screening

Nam June Paik’s Radical Fun

Thursday, June 30, 2022, 7:30pm
Anthology Film Archives, New York
anthologyfilmarchives.org

Join us for a video program that brings together a selection of Nam June Paik’s analog video works along with Internet-era works by artists including Ilana Harris-Babou, Frank Heath, Maggie Lee, Guthrie Lonergan, LoVid, and Martine Syms. The selection is curated by Rebecca Cleman, executive director at Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), and copresented by Anthology Film Archives, EAI, and Gagosian, on the occasion of Art in Process, a two-part survey of works by Paik at Gagosian, New York.

Since the early 1960s, Paik’s prescient thinking about how artists can exploit television and computer technology has resonated through generations, particularly with regard to his mischievous opposition to industry conformity. His strongly held belief in the radical potential of fun, and his understanding of technological innovation as nurturing artistic innovation, have remained relevant through profound changes in communication platforms. To attend the event, purchase tickets at ticketing.uswest.veezi.com.

Nam June Paik, Edited for Television, 1975 (still) © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: courtesy Electronic Arts Intermix

Ed Ruscha, The Future, 1999 © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Jeff McLane

Exhibition

The Future

November 30, 2020–January 31, 2021
gagosian-deitch.com

Gagosian is pleased to announce The Future, the sixth in a series of annual thematic exhibitions presented by Gagosian and Jeffrey Deitch during Art Basel Miami Beach. Previously staged at the historic Moore Building in the Miami Design District, this year the collaborative project will be hosted on a new stand-alone website.

Ed Ruscha, The Future, 1999 © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Jeff McLane

Adam McEwen, Escape from New York, 2014 (still from “Battery Tunnel”) © Adam McEwen

Exhibition

Broadcast
Alternate Meanings in Film and Video

You’re only as young as the last time you changed your mind.
—Timothy Leary

Gagosian is pleased to present Broadcast: Alternate Meanings in Film and Video, an online exhibition of artists’ films and videos viewable exclusively on gagosian.com. The exhibition will be organized into a series of “chapters,” each lasting two weeks. The first chapter begins on Tuesday, May 19, 2020.

Broadcast: Alternate Meanings in Film and Video employs the innate immediacy of time-based art to spark reflection on the here and now, taking the words of famed psychologist and countercultural icon Timothy Leary as its starting point. 

Adam McEwen, Escape from New York, 2014 (still from “Battery Tunnel”) © Adam McEwen

Nam June Paik, Nixon, 1965–2002 © Nam June Paik Estate

Panel Discussion

Cécile B. Evans, Haroon Mirza, and Stephen Vitiello on Nam June Paik

Tuesday, October 29, 2019, 6:30–8pm
Tate Modern, London
www.tate.org.uk

In conjunction with the exhibition Nam June Paik at Tate Modern, London, there will be a panel discussion to reflect on Paik’s continuing influence on art and culture today. Artists Cécile B. Evans, Haroon Mirza, and Stephen Vitiello will lead the discussion, and Sook-Kyung Lee, senior curator of international art at Tate, will moderate.

Nam June Paik, Nixon, 1965–2002 © Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Global Groove, 1973 (still) © Nam June Paik Estate, courtesy Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York

Screening

Videocittà
Nam June Paik

Saturday, October 20, 2018, 11am–10pm
Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo, Rome
www.maxxi.art

The first day of Videocittà, a video art film festival at Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo, Rome, will be dedicated to Nam June Paik with screenings of his films Global Groove (1973) and Bye Bye Kipling (1986). To attend the event, purchase tickets at www.maxxi.art.

Nam June Paik, Global Groove, 1973 (still) © Nam June Paik Estate, courtesy Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York

Announcements

TateShots

Video

TateShots
Nam June Paik

In this episode of weekly web series TateShots, Nam June Paik’s nephew inventor Ken Hakuta speaks about his uncle’s influence and legacy in the art world and beyond.

Museum Exhibitions

Hao Liang, Eight Views of Xiaoxiang—Dazzle, 2015 © Hao Liang. Photo: courtesy UCCA Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing

On View

The Dream of the Museum

Through April 23, 2023
M+, Hong Kong
www.mplus.org.hk

The Dream of the Museum examines the concept of found objects to show how artists use cultures as source material to update tradition. Beginning with four pioneers of contemporary art—Marcel Duchamp, John Cage, Yoko Ono, and Nam June Paik—the exhibition brings together work by twenty-seven artists from across geographies and generations, including Hao Liang and Andy Warhol, who explore chance and found objects in their work.

Hao Liang, Eight Views of XiaoxiangDazzle, 2015 © Hao Liang. Photo: courtesy UCCA Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing

Mary Weatherford, Engine, 2014, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio

Closed

America. Entre rêves et réalités
La collection du Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection

June 9–September 11, 2022
Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Canada
www.mnbaq.org

Featuring more than a hundred paintings, photographs, sculptures, and video works drawn from the permanent collection of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, DC, this exhibition, whose title translates to America. Between Dreams and Realities, offers a broad overview of modern and contemporary American art. Organized thematically, it looks carefully and critically at the notion of the American dream and uncovers how artists have variously grappled with questions of identity, the challenges of globalization, the realities of everyday life in America, and the complexities of its technological and political revolutions. Work by Alexander Calder, Willem de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Sally Mann, Man Ray, Brice Marden, Nam June Paik, Ed Ruscha, Andy Warhol, and Mary Weatherford is included.

Mary Weatherford, Engine, 2014, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio

Nam June Paik, One Candle, 2004 © Estate of Nam June Paik. Photo: Jon Huffman

Closed

Nam June Paik
The Future Is Now

December 10, 2021–March 27, 2022
National Gallery Singapore
www.nationalgallery.sg

This major exhibition brings together more than two hundred works from throughout Nam June Paik’s five-decade career—from robots made from old TV screens, to his innovative video works, and all-encompassing room-size installations. The exhibition looks at his close collaborations with Joseph Beuys, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Charlotte Moorman, and others. This exhibition originated at the Tate Modern in London.

Nam June Paik, One Candle, 2004 © Estate of Nam June Paik. Photo: Jon Huffman

Nam June Paik, Sistine Chapel, 1993, installation view, Tate Modern, London © Estate of Nam June Paik. Photo: Andrew Dunkley 

Closed

Nam June Paik

May 8–October 3, 2021
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
www.sfmoma.org

This major exhibition brings together more than two hundred works from throughout Nam June Paik’s five-decade career—from robots made from old TV screens, to his innovative video works, and all-encompassing room-size installations. The exhibition looks at his close collaborations with Joseph Beuys, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Charlotte Moorman, and others. This exhibition originated at the Tate Modern in London.

Nam June Paik, Sistine Chapel, 1993, installation view, Tate Modern, London © Estate of Nam June Paik. Photo: Andrew Dunkley 

Chris Burden, The Atomic Alphabet, 1980 © Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Closed

Disonata
Arte en sonido hasta 1980

September 23, 2020–March 1, 2021
Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid
www.museoreinasofia.es

This exhibition, whose English title is Disonata: Art in Sound up to 1980, analyzes the development of sound as a creative field of visual arts differentiated from music across the first eighty years of the twentieth century. The show reflects the efforts of artists who resorted to sound beyond its traditional use in such manifestations as mixed-media work, poetry, and theater. Work by  Chris Burden and Nam June Paik is included.

Chris Burden, The Atomic Alphabet, 1980 © Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Installation view, Untitled, 2020, Punta della Dogana, Venice, March 22–December 13, 2020. Artwork © Thomas Houseago. Photo: Marco Cappelletti/DSL Studio

Closed

Untitled, 2020

March 22–November 4, 2020
Punta della Dogana, Venice
www.palazzograssi.it

Conceived and curated by Thomas Houseago, Muna El Fituri, and Caroline Bourgeois, Untitled, 2020 places into dialogue works in a broad range of media by more than sixty artists held by the Pinault Collection, international museums, and private collections. The exhibition centers around a re-creation of Houseago’s studio in Tadao Ando’s cube room, in the heart of Punta della Dogana. Work by Ellen Gallagher, Duane Hanson, Mike Kelley, Henry Moore, and Nam June Paik is included.

Installation view, Untitled, 2020, Punta della Dogana, Venice, March 22–December 13, 2020. Artwork © Thomas Houseago. Photo: Marco Cappelletti/DSL Studio

Nam June Paik, Internet Dream, 1994, installation view, Tate Modern, London © Estate of Nam June Paik

Closed

Nam June Paik
The Future Is Now

March 14–October 4, 2020
Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
www.stedelijk.nl

This major exhibition brings together more than two hundred works from throughout Nam June Paik’s five-decade career—from robots made from old TV screens, to his innovative video works, and all-encompassing room-size installations. The exhibition looks at his close collaborations with Joseph Beuys, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Charlotte Moorman, and others. This exhibition has traveled from the Tate Modern in London.

Nam June Paik, Internet Dream, 1994, installation view, Tate Modern, London © Estate of Nam June Paik

Nam June Paik, TV Garden, 1974–77 © Estate of Nam June Paik

Closed

Nam June Paik

October 17, 2019–February 9, 2020
Tate Modern, London
www.tate.org.uk

This major exhibition brings together more than two hundred works from throughout Nam June Paik’s five-decade career—from robots made from old TV screens, to his innovative video works, and all-encompassing room-size installations. The exhibition looks at his close collaborations with Joseph Beuys, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Charlotte Moorman, and others.

Nam June Paik, TV Garden, 1974–77 © Estate of Nam June Paik

Nam June Paik, TV Cello, 1971 © Nam June Paik Estate

Closed

The Body Electric

March 30–July 21, 2019
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis
walkerart.org

In an age dominated by digital technology, The Body Electric explores themes of the real and the virtual, the organic and the artificial, moving from world to screen and back again. This exhibition presents work by an international and intergenerational group of artists who examine ways that photographic, televisual, and digital media change our perceptions of the human body and everyday life. Work by Bruce Nauman and Nam June Paik is included.

Nam June Paik, TV Cello, 1971 © Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Fin de Siecle II, 1989, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York © Nam June Paik Estate

Closed

Nam June Paik in
Programmed: Rules, Codes, and Choreographies in Art, 1965–2018

September 28, 2018–April 14, 2019
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
whitney.org

This exhibition aims to establish connections between works of art based on instructions, spanning more than fifty years of conceptual, video, and computational art. The pieces in the show are all “programmed” using instructions, sets of rules, and code, but they also address the use of programming in their creation. Work by Nam June Paik is included.

Nam June Paik, Fin de Siecle II, 1989, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York © Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, TV Clock, 1963/89 © Nam June Paik Estate

Closed

Nam June Paik
TV Clock

May 20–October 14, 2018
Santa Barbara Museum of Art, California
www.sbma.net

Nam June Paik’s TV Clock (1963/89) is on view for the first time in nearly a decade. The work consists of twenty-four color televisions mounted upright on pedestals that are arranged in a gentle arc and displayed in a darkened space. Paik created each electronic image by manipulating the television to compress its red, green, and blue colors into a single line against a black background.

Nam June Paik, TV Clock, 1963/89 © Nam June Paik Estate

Robert Therrien, No title (table leg), 2010 © Robert Therrien/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Peter Cox

Closed

No Place Like Home

March 1–June 3, 2018
Museu Coleção Berardo, Lisbon, Portugal
en.museuberardo.pt

In celebration of Dada’s one hundredth anniversary in 2016 and the centennial of Marcel Duchamp’s Fountain in 2017, this exhibition examines how artists have incorporated commonplace household items into their work, removing these objects from the context of the home in ways that subvert the experiences of daily life. This exhibit has traveled from the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. Work by Duchamp, Duane Hanson, Damien Hirst, Man Ray, Takashi Murakami, Nam June Paik, Robert Therrien, and Andy Warhol is included.

Robert Therrien, No title (table leg), 2010 © Robert Therrien/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Peter Cox

See all Museum Exhibitions for Nam June Paik