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Helen Frankenthaler, Star Gazing, 1989, collection of Helen Frankenthaler Foundation© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Peindre la nuit

Through April 15, 2019
Centre Pompidou-Metz, France
www.centrepompidou-metz.fr

This exhibition explores the night in modern and contemporary painting, music, literature, photography, and video. With a focus on the perception of night rather than its iconography, the exhibition intends to be a nocturnal experience. Work by Francis Bacon and Helen Frankenthaler is included.

Helen Frankenthaler, Star Gazing, 1989, collection of Helen Frankenthaler Foundation

© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, First Stone, 1961, working proof 2 © 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE), West Islip, New York

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Helen Frankenthaler Prints
The Romance of a New Medium

April 20–September 3, 2018
Art Institute of Chicago
www.artic.edu

For nearly two decades Helen Frankenthaler produced prints at the Universal Limited Art Editions workshop. This exhibition presents more than fifty prints of Frankenthaler’s ULAE productions along with rare and important loans, including proofs from the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation that illustrate the artist’s working methods and explore the evolution of an image from initial idea to final published edition.

Helen Frankenthaler, First Stone, 1961, working proof 2 © 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE), West Islip, New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Provincetown Window, 1963–64 © 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Tim Pyle, Light Blue Studio, courtesy Helen Frankenthaler Foundation

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Abstract Climates
Helen Frankenthaler in Provincetown

July 6–September 2, 2018
Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Massachusetts
www.paam.org

In 1950, at the encouragement of art critic Clement Greenberg, Helen Frankenthaler studied briefly in Provincetown with Hans Hofmann. Following her marriage to Robert Motherwell in 1958, she spent more than a decade of summers living and working there. Abstract Climates: Helen Frankenthaler in Provincetown will present key examples of Frankenthaler’s work, beginning with those made in that first summer at Hofmann’s studio school, and going on to focus on the period from the late 1950s through 1969. It will also feature photographs, letters, and memorabilia that shed light on the artist’s process, with an emphasis on the meaning of the place and its impact on her development as a painter.

Helen Frankenthaler, Provincetown Window, 1963–64 © 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Tim Pyle, Light Blue Studio, courtesy Helen Frankenthaler Foundation

Helen Frankenthaler, Milkwood Arcade, 1963 © 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Helen Frankenthaler in
The Water Lilies: American Abstract Art and the Last Monet

April 13–August 20, 2018
Musée de l’Orangerie, Paris
www.musee-orangerie.fr

In 1955, Alfred H. Barr Jr. brought one of Claude Monet’s large panels of Water Lilies into the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. At that time, Monet’s work was presented as “a bridge between the naturalism of early Impressionism and the highly developed school of abstract art” in New York. This exhibition focuses on the precise moment when these paintings were rediscovered and the New York School was first being recognized. Included are a selection of some of Monet’s later works and some twenty major paintings by American artists. Work by Helen Frankenthaler is included.

Helen Frankenthaler, Milkwood Arcade, 1963 © 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Red Shift, 1990 © 2017 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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As in Nature
Helen Frankenthaler Paintings

July 1–October 9, 2017
The Clark, Williamstown, Massachusetts
www.clarkart.edu

As in Nature comprises a selection of large paintings by Helen Frankenthaler from the 1950s through the 1990s, focusing on nature as a long-standing inspiration. This exhibition reveals the full range of styles and techniques that Frankenthaler explored and focuses on the complex meanings behind the color in her paintings.

Helen Frankenthaler, Red Shift, 1990 © 2017 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Savage Breeze, 1974 © 2017 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE), West Islip, L.I., New York

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No Rules
Helen Frankenthaler Woodcuts

July 1–September 24, 2017
The Clark, Williamstown, Massachusetts
www.clarkart.edu

No Rules explores Helen Frankenthaler’s inventive and groundbreaking approach to the woodcut, a medium she explored for over four decades. She began creating woodcuts after experimenting with lithography, etching, and screen-printing and worked with a variety of print publishers to push the medium in new directions.

Helen Frankenthaler, Savage Breeze, 1974 © 2017 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE), West Islip, L.I., New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Trojan Gates, 1955, Museum of Modern Art, New York © 2017 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Helen Frankenthaler in
Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction

April 15–August 13, 2017
Museum of Modern Art, New York
www.moma.org

In the postwar era, societal shifts made it possible for larger numbers of women to work professionally as artists, yet few support networks existed for them. Drawn from the museum’s collection, the exhibition features more than one hundred paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, prints, textiles, and ceramics by some fifty women artists, including Helen Frankenthaler.

Helen Frankenthaler, Trojan Gates, 1955, Museum of Modern Art, New York © 2017 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Andy Warhol, Woman in Blue (After Matisse), 1985 © 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Matisse and American Art

February 5–June 18, 2017
Montclair Art Museum, New Jersey
www.montclairartmuseum.org

Curated by Gail Stavitsky, this exhibition focuses on the French master’s profound impact on the development of American modern art from 1907 to the present. Nineteen works by Matisse are juxtaposed with forty-four works by American artists, including Helen Frankenthaler, Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, and Tom Wesselmann.

Andy Warhol, Woman in Blue (After Matisse), 1985 © 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York

Ed Ruscha, Made in California, 1971 © Ed Ruscha

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The American Dream
Pop to the Present

March 9–June 18, 2017
British Museum, London
americandreamexhibition.org

This exhibition traces the past six decades of American history through prints of unprecedented scale and ambition. Starting with the explosion of Pop art in the 1960s, the show includes works by many of America’s most celebrated artists. Works by Helen Frankenthaler, Roy Lichtenstein, Bruce Nauman, Ed Ruscha, Richard Serra, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol, and Tom Wesselmann are on view.

Ed Ruscha, Made in California, 1971 © Ed Ruscha

Brice Marden, Untitled, 1988–91 © Brice Marden/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York

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The Beginning of Everything
Drawings from the Janie C. Lee, Louisa Stude Sarofim, and David Whitney Collections

February 24–June 18, 2017
The Menil Collection, Houston
www.menil.org

In anticipation of the October 2017 opening of the Menil Drawing Institute, the museum is exhibiting a selection of drawings spanning the mid-nineteenth to the late twentieth century. The show highlights promised gifts from the collections of Janie C. Lee and Louisa Stude Sarofim, as well as works from David Whitney’s 2005 bequest, which include those by Balthus, Georg Baselitz, Helen Frankenthaler, Alberto Giacometti, Anselm Kiefer, Brice Marden, Bruce Nauman, Richard Serra, Cy Twombly, and Rachel Whiteread.

Brice Marden, Untitled, 1988–91 © Brice Marden/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Western Dream, 1957, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2017 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Rob McKeever

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Helen Frankenthaler in
Women of Abstract Expressionism

February 18–May 28, 2017
Palm Springs Art Museum, California
www.psmuseum.org

This exhibition presents the work of twelve American women artists active in New York City and the San Francisco Bay Area in the late 1940s and 1950s. As part of a circle of painters known as Abstract Expressionists, these women helped forge the first fully American modern art movement.

Helen Frankenthaler, Western Dream, 1957, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2017 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Rob McKeever

Andy Warhol, Flower, 1964 © 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Therese Husby, courtesy Nasjonalmuseet 

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The Great Graphic Boom

March 3–May 28, 2017
Nasjonalmuseet, Oslo
www.nasjonalmuseet.no

This exhibition explores the intense interest in graphic art among many leading artists of the postwar art period. With works from twenty-five artists, including Helen Frankenthaler, Roy Lichtenstein, Brice Marden, Bruce Nauman, Ed Ruscha, Richard Serra, Cy Twombly, and Andy Warhol, the show highlights the use of graphic media both as a refined form of expression and as an important phase in the artistic process. The exhibition has been organized with support from Staatsgalerie Stuttgart, Germany.

Andy Warhol, Flower, 1964 © 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Therese Husby, courtesy Nasjonalmuseet 

Photo by Nathalie Savale

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Hartung and Lyrical Painters

December 11, 2016–April 17, 2017
Fonds Hèlène & Èdouard Leclerc pour la Culture, Landerneau, France
www.fonds-culturel-leclerc.fr

Exploring the history of lyrical abstraction, this exhibition, curated by Xavier Douroux, brings together notable modern and contemporary artists who resonate with the work of Hans Hartung. Works by Helen Frankenthaler, Albert Oehlen, Cy Twombly, and Christopher Wool are on view.

Photo by Nathalie Savale