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Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1994 © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Helen Frankenthaler
Malerische Konstellationen

Through March 5, 2023
Museum Folkwang, Essen, Germany
www.museum-folkwang.de

This exhibition, whose title translates to Painterly Constellations, is the first monographic show of Helen Frankenthaler’s work in Germany in more than twenty years. It features seventy-five works on paper alongside a selection of paintings from distinct phases in Frankenthaler’s career. These range in size from intimate to monumental; some reference landscape, while others are resolutely abstract. This exhibition has traveled from Kunsthalle Krems, Krems an der Donau, Austria.

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1994 © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Sally Mann, The Bath, 1989 © Sally Mann

On View

Monochrome Multitudes

Through January 8, 2023
Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago
smartmuseum.uchicago.edu

Revisiting classic modernist ideas about flatness, idealized form, and colors, this exhibition opens up the seemingly reductive format of the monochrome to reveal its global resonance and creative possibilities while working toward a more expansive narrative of twentieth and twenty-first century art. Work by Alexander Calder, Walter De Maria, Helen Frankenthaler, Theaster Gates, Frank Gehry, Sally Mann, and Richard Serra is included.

Sally Mann, The Bath, 1989 © Sally Mann

Helen Frankenthaler, Beach Scene, 1961, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

On View

Ways of Freedom
Jackson Pollock to Maria Lassnig

Through January 22, 2023
Albertina Modern, Vienna
www.albertina.at

Ways of Freedom examines the creative interplay between Abstract Expressionism and Art Informel in a transatlantic exchange and dialogue from the mid-1940s to the end of the Cold War. Exploring radically impulsive approaches to form, color, and material, the exhibition includes more than ninety works by nearly fifty artists with loans from museums worldwide. This exhibition has traveled from the Museum Barberini in Potsdam, Germany under the title The Shape of Freedom: International Abstraction after 1945Work by Willem de KooningHelen Frankenthaler, and Simon Hantaï is included.

Helen Frankenthaler, Beach Scene, 1961, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Installation view, Helen Frankenthaler: Late Works, 1990–2003, Baker Museum, Naples, Florida, September 6, 2022–February 5, 2023. Artwork © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: RoseBudz Productions, courtesy Baker Museum, Naples, Florida

On View

Helen Frankenthaler
Late Works, 1990–2003

Through February 5, 2023
Baker Museum, Naples, Florida
artisnaples.org

Marking the first museum presentation exclusively dedicated to the late work of Helen Frankenthaler, this exhibition features ten paintings and twenty works on paper dating from 1990 to 2003, some measuring more than six feet in length. Through her invention of the soak-stain technique, Frankenthaler expanded the possibilities of abstract painting while referencing figuration and landscape in unique ways. In later years, her practice continued to evolve through her use of diverse media and processes, as she shifted from painting canvas on the floor to using larger sheets of paper laid out on the floor or on tabletops for easier accessibility. The continuity, in terms of content and execution between the late work (post-1990) and what came before it, is striking. Graced with memorable encounters, a vast art-historical image bank, and technical prowess, the aging artist moved in whatever direction suited her mood and imagination. This exhibition originated at the New Britain Museum of American Art in Connecticut.

Installation view, Helen Frankenthaler: Late Works, 1990–2003, Baker Museum, Naples, Florida, September 6, 2022–February 5, 2023. Artwork © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: RoseBudz Productions, courtesy Baker Museum, Naples, Florida

Helen Frankenthaler, Deep Sun, 1983, Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, New York. Photo: Tim Pyle, Blue Light Studio

On View

Helen Frankenthaler and Jo Sandman
Without Limits

Through March 12, 2023
Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine
www.bowdoin.edu

Born three years apart, Helen Frankenthaler (1928–2011) and Jo Sandman (b. 1931) matured absorbing the lessons of Abstract Expressionism. In the early 1960s both artists expanded beyond their painting practices (though never abandoned them) to explore new modes of expression. Although they worked independently of one another, Frankenthaler and Sandman, as a pair, point toward new modes of conceptualizing art practice and the important role of printmaking in that revolution.

Helen Frankenthaler, Deep Sun, 1983, Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, New York. Photo: Tim Pyle, Blue Light Studio

Francis Bacon, Study for a Portrait, 1967, installation view, Seattle Art Museum © The Estate of Francis Bacon. Photo: Jueqian Fang

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Frisson
The Richard E. Lang and Jane Lang Davis Collection

October 15, 2021–November 27, 2022
Seattle Art Museum
www.seattleartmuseum.org

This exhibition celebrates the Friday Foundation’s gift of nineteen artworks from the Lang Collection to the Seattle Art Museum in honor of Seattle collectors Richard E. Lang and Jane Lang Davis. Dating from 1945 to 1976, the paintings, drawings, and sculptures in Frisson represent mature works and pivotal moments of artistic development from some of the most influential American and European artists of the postwar period. Work by Francis Bacon, Willem de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, and Alberto Giacometti is included.  

Francis Bacon, Study for a Portrait, 1967, installation view, Seattle Art Museum © The Estate of Francis Bacon. Photo: Jueqian Fang

Helen Frankenthaler, Grotto Azura, 1963, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Helen Frankenthaler
Malerische Konstellationen

April 23–October 30, 2022
Kunsthalle Krems, Krems an der Donau, Austria
www.kunsthalle.at

This exhibition, whose title translates to Painterly Constellations, is the first monographic show of Helen Frankenthaler’s work in Austria. It features seventy-four works on paper alongside a selection of paintings from distinct phases in Frankenthaler’s career. These range in size from intimate to monumental; some reference landscape, while others are resolutely abstract.

Helen Frankenthaler, Grotto Azura, 1963, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Installation view, The Shape of Freedom: International Abstraction after 1945, Museum Barberini, Potsdam, Germany, June 4–September 25, 2022. Artwork, left to right: © The Estate of Morris Louis/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany 2022; © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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The Shape of Freedom
International Abstraction after 1945

June 4–September 25, 2022
Museum Barberini, Potsdam, Germany
www.museum-barberini.de

The Shape of Freedom examines the creative interplay between Abstract Expressionism and Art Informel in transatlantic exchange and dialogue, from the mid-1940s to the end of the Cold War. Exploring radically impulsive approaches to form, color, and material, the exhibition includes more than ninety works by nearly fifty artists with loans from museums worldwide. Work by Willem de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, and Simon Hantaï is included.

Installation view, The Shape of Freedom: International Abstraction after 1945, Museum Barberini, Potsdam, Germany, June 4–September 25, 2022. Artwork, left to right: © The Estate of Morris Louis/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany 2022; © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Mary Weatherford, Engine, 2014, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio

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America. Entre rêves et réalités
La collection du Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection

June 9–September 11, 2022
Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Canada
www.mnbaq.org

Featuring more than a hundred paintings, photographs, sculptures, and video works drawn from the permanent collection of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, DC, this exhibition, whose title translates to America. Between Dreams and Realities, offers a broad overview of modern and contemporary American art. Organized thematically, it looks carefully and critically at the notion of the American dream and uncovers how artists have variously grappled with questions of identity, the challenges of globalization, the realities of everyday life in America, and the complexities of its technological and political revolutions. Work by Alexander Calder, Willem de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Sally Mann, Man Ray, Brice Marden, Nam June Paik, Ed Ruscha, Andy Warhol, and Mary Weatherford is included.

Mary Weatherford, Engine, 2014, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio

Helen Frankenthaler, Cameo, 1980 © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./DACS/Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, New York

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Helen Frankenthaler
Radical Beauty

September 15, 2021–April 18, 2022
Dulwich Picture Gallery, London
www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk

Radical Beauty presents Helen Frankenthaler’s groundbreaking woodcuts, which appear painterly and spontaneous with expanses of color and fluid forms. The exhibition reveals Frankenthaler as a trailblazer of the mid-century printmaking renaissance among American abstract artists, endlessly pushing the possibilities of the medium through experimentation. Highlights of the exhibition include East and Beyond (1973), created by printing onto multiple blocks to avoid negative space, and Cameo (1980), in which Frankenthaler introduced a new layered approach to color using her “guzzying” technique, where she worked surfaces with sandpaper and dental tools to achieve different effects.

Helen Frankenthaler, Cameo, 1980 © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./DACS/Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, New York

Installation view, Helen Frankenthaler: Late Works, 1990–2003, Palm Springs Art Museum, California, October 14, 2021–February 27, 2022. Artwork © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Closed

Helen Frankenthaler
Late Works, 1990–2003

October 14, 2021–February 27, 2022
Palm Springs Art Museum, California
www.psmuseum.org

Marking the first museum presentation dedicated to the late work of Helen Frankenthaler, this exhibition features ten paintings and twenty works on paper dating from 1990 to 2003, some measuring more than six feet. Through her invention of the soak-stain technique, Frankenthaler expanded the possibilities of abstract painting while referencing figuration and landscape in unique ways. In later years, her practice continued to evolve through her use of diverse media and processes, as she shifted from painting canvas on the floor to using larger sheets of paper that were laid out on the floor or on tabletops for easier accessibility. The continuity, in terms of content and execution, between the late work (post-1990) and what came before is striking. Graced with memorable encounters, a vast art historical image bank, and technical prowess, the aging artist moved in whatever direction suited her mood and imagination. This exhibition originated at the New Britain Museum of American Art in Connecticut.

Installation view, Helen Frankenthaler: Late Works, 1990–2003, Palm Springs Art Museum, California, October 14, 2021–February 27, 2022. Artwork © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1967, Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Chiron Press, New York

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Without Limits
Helen Frankenthaler, Abstraction, and the Language of Print

September 4, 2021–February 20, 2022
Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas at Austin
blantonmuseum.org

Without Limits celebrates the generous gift from the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation to the Blanton Museum of Art of ten prints and six proofs that span five decades of the artist’s career. Frankenthaler began creating prints in 1961, approaching lithography, screen printing, etching, and woodcut printing with curiosity and vision. Collaborating with master printmakers at studios such as Universal Limited Art Editions (ulae), Mixografia, and Tyler Graphics, Ltd., she contributed to a printmaking renaissance in the mid-twentieth century. Her work is presented alongside prints by other artists in the Blanton’s collection who also use the medium to capture and translate their own abstract visions.

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1967, Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Chiron Press, New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Europa, 1957 © 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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In the Studio: Room 8
Helen Frankenthaler

November 15, 2019–November 28, 2021
Tate Modern, London
www.tate.org.uk

Tate Modern presents five works by Helen Frankenthaler, ranging in date from 1951 to 1977. Four of the works are on loan from the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York, and the fifth was recently gifted to the Tate by the Foundation. The display marks the artist’s first extensive museum presentation of paintings in London since 1969.

Helen Frankenthaler, Europa, 1957 © 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Floe IV, 1965, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

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Helen Frankenthaler in
Women Take the Floor

September 13, 2019–November 28, 2021
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
www.mfa.org

Women Take the Floor challenges the dominant history of twentieth-century American art by focusing on the overlooked and underrepresented work and stories of women artists. With more than two hundred works drawn primarily from the museum’s collection, the exhibition is organized into seven thematic galleries. Work by Helen Frankenthaler is included.

Helen Frankenthaler, Floe IV, 1965, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Helen Frankenthaler, Cassis, 1995, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Helen Frankenthaler
Late Works, 1990–2003

June 12–August 28, 2021
Weatherspoon Art Museum, University of North Carolina, Greensboro
weatherspoonart.org

Marking the first museum presentation dedicated to the late work of Helen Frankenthaler, this exhibition features twenty-two works on paper dating from 1990 to 2003, some measuring more than six feet. Through her invention of the soak-stain technique, Frankenthaler expanded the possibilities of abstract painting while referencing figuration and landscape in unique ways. In later years, her practice continued to evolve through her use of diverse media and processes, as she shifted from painting canvas on the floor to using larger sheets of paper that were laid out on the floor or on tabletops for easier accessibility. The continuity, in terms of content and execution, between the late work (post-1990) and what came before is striking. Graced with memorable encounters, a vast art historical image bank, and technical prowess, the aging artist moved in whatever direction suited her mood and imagination. This exhibition has traveled from the New Britain Museum of American Art in Connecticut.

Helen Frankenthaler, Cassis, 1995, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Open Wall, 1953, collection of Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Helen Frankenthaler in
Women in Abstraction

May 19–August 23, 2021
Centre Pompidou, Paris
www.centrepompidou.fr

Setting out to trace a lesser-told history of art by focusing on the contributions of women artists to abstraction, this exhibition features more than five hundred works dating from the 1860s to the 1980s. The multidisciplinary and global curatorial approach includes painting, sculpture, dance, applied arts, photography, film, and performance art from Latin America, the Middle East, Asia, Europe, and the United States in order to tell a complex story with many voices. Work by Helen Frankenthaler is included.

Helen Frankenthaler, Open Wall, 1953, collection of Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Solar Imp, 1995, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Roz Akin

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Helen Frankenthaler
Late Works, 1990–2003

February 11–May 23, 2021
New Britain Museum of American Art, Connecticut
nbmaa.org

Marking the first museum presentation dedicated to the late work of Helen Frankenthaler, this exhibition features twenty-two works on paper dating from 1990 to 2003, some measuring more than six feet. Through her invention of the soak-stain technique, Frankenthaler expanded the possibilities of abstract painting while referencing figuration and landscape in unique ways. In later years, her practice continued to evolve through her use of diverse media and processes, as she shifted from painting canvas on the floor to using larger sheets of paper that were laid out on the floor or on tabletops for easier accessibility. The continuity, in terms of content and execution, between the late work (post-1990) and what came before is striking. Graced with memorable encounters, a vast art historical image bank, and technical prowess, the aging artist moved in whatever direction suited her mood and imagination.

Helen Frankenthaler, Solar Imp, 1995, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Roz Akin

Helen Frankenthaler, Lorelei, 1957, Brooklyn Museum, New York © 2020 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Helen Frankenthaler in
Out of Place: A Feminist Look at the Collection

January 24–September 13, 2020
Brooklyn Museum, New York
www.brooklynmuseum.org

Out of Place presents the work of forty-four artists whose practices engender a broader and more dynamic view of modern and contemporary art. By featuring works that have routinely been regarded as “out of place” in major museums, the exhibition examines how artists can transform long-held cultural assumptions. Work by Helen Frankenthaler is included.

Helen Frankenthaler, Lorelei, 1957, Brooklyn Museum, New York © 2020 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Canal, 1963 © 2020 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Helen Frankenthaler in
The Fullness of Color: 1960s Painting

December 18, 2019–August 2, 2020
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
www.guggenheim.org

In the 1960s a group of avant-garde painters began to push abstraction in new directions, their attempts leading to the emergence of several divergent styles. Works in this presentation chart several of the varied and complex courses nonrepresentational art followed in the 1960s and into the 1970s. This exhibition reflects the museum’s historical engagement with this artistic period. Work by Helen Frankenthaler is included.

Helen Frankenthaler, Canal, 1963 © 2020 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Installation view, Contemporary Art: Five Propositions, Museum of Fine Art, Boston, October 26, 2019–May 4, 2020

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Contemporary Art
Five Propositions

October 26, 2019–May 4, 2020
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
www.mfa.org

Through five thematic groupings, this exhibition seeks to rethink the stories that can be told with the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston’s collection of contemporary art. The groupings address a range of topics, including artistic process and complex relationships between humans and the natural world, the body, materials, identity, and notions of utopia. Work by Georg Baselitz, Helen Frankenthaler, and Andy Warhol is included.

Installation view, Contemporary Art: Five Propositions, Museum of Fine Art, Boston, October 26, 2019–May 4, 2020

Albert Oehlen, Untitled, 1989, Museum of Modern Art, New York © Albert Oehlen 

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Artist’s Choice
Amy Sillman—The Shape of Shape

October 21, 2019–April 12, 2020
Museum of Modern Art, New York
www.moma.org

In The Shape of Shape, Amy Sillman—an artist who has helped redefine contemporary painting, pushing the medium into drawing, installations, video, and zines—has created a revelatory Artist’s Choice installation drawn from the museum’s collection. The exhibition features works, many rarely seen, spanning vastly different time periods, places, and mediums. Work by Jay DeFeo, Helen Frankenthaler, Howard Hodgkin, Henry Moore, Albert Oehlen, and Christopher Wool is included.

Albert Oehlen, Untitled, 1989, Museum of Modern Art, New York © Albert Oehlen 

Helen Frankenthaler, Fiesta, 1973 © 2020 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Frankenthaler on Paper

January 17–March 29, 2020
Arthur Ross Gallery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
www.arthurrossgallery.org

Helen Frankenthaler played a seminal role in both Abstract Expressionism and Color Field painting. This exhibition presents ten unique paintings on paper and fourteen prints that date from the 1970s to the 1990s. These rarely seen paintings on paper reflect Frankenthaler’s painterly process and were considered by the artist to be equal to her large-scale paintings.

Helen Frankenthaler, Fiesta, 1973 © 2020 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Western Dream, 1957, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Epic Abstraction
Pollock to Herrera

December 17, 2018–February 4, 2020
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
www.metmuseum.org

Epic Abstraction: Pollock to Herrera explores large-scale abstract painting, sculpture, and assemblage, from the 1940s to the twenty-first century, through works from the Met collection and special loans. Many of the artists in the exhibition worked in large formats not only to explore aesthetic elements of line, color, shape, and texture, but also to activate scale’s metaphoric potential to evoke expansive—“epic”—ideas and subjects, including time, history, nature, and existential concerns of the self. Work by Helen Frankenthaler and Cy Twombly is included.

Helen Frankenthaler, Western Dream, 1957, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Mount Sinai, 1956, Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase College, State University of New York © 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Helen Frankenthaler in
Sparkling Amazons: Abstract Expressionist Women of the 9th St. Show

October 6, 2019–January 26, 2020
Katonah Museum of Art, New York
www.katonahmuseum.org

Sparkling Amazons presents the often-overlooked contribution by women artists to the Abstract Expressionist movement and the significant role they played as bold innovators within the New York School during the 1940s and ’50s. Through the presentation of some thirty works of art alongside documentary photography, the exhibition captures an important moment in the history of Abstract Expressionism. Work by Helen Frankenthaler is included.

Helen Frankenthaler, Mount Sinai, 1956, Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase College, State University of New York © 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York