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Richard Prince, Untitled (Cowboy), 2016 © Richard Prince Studio

On View

Richard Prince

Through April 10, 2023
Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark
louisiana.dk

Richard Prince is a perceptive chronicler of American subcultures and vernaculars and their role in the construction of American identity. In his paintings, he probes the depths of racism, sexism, and psychosis in mainstream humor; the mythical status of cowboys, bikers, customized cars, and celebrities; and most recently, the push-pull allure of pulp fiction and soft porn, producing such unlikely icons as the Nurse paintings. Prince manages to identify and sample visual codes and finely tune them so that they become seductive and strange despite their banality. This exhibition—part of the Louisiana on Paper series, which focuses on drawings—also includes a number of important paintings, photographs, and sculptures encompassing many different bodies of work from throughout Prince’s career.

Richard Prince, Untitled (Cowboy), 2016 © Richard Prince Studio

Jennifer Guidi, Seeking Hearts (Black MT, Pink Sand, Pink CS, Pink Ground), 2021 © Jennifer Guidi. Photo: Brica Wilcox

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Artists Inspired by Music
Interscope Reimagined

January 30–February 13, 2022
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
www.lacma.org

To mark the thirtieth anniversary of Interscope Records, the company invited artists to select albums and songs from Interscope’s groundbreaking catalogue and fostered exchanges between artists and musicians to generate resonant pairings. The exhibition, which includes more than fifty works, brings an intergenerational group of visual artists into dialogue with iconic musicians from the last three decades, providing a fresh perspective on influential music for the present moment. Work by John Currin, Jennifer Guidi, Damien Hirst, Titus Kaphar, Takashi Murakami, Richard Prince, Ed Ruscha, and Anna Weyant is included.

Jennifer Guidi, Seeking Hearts (Black MT, Pink Sand, Pink CS, Pink Ground), 2021 © Jennifer Guidi. Photo: Brica Wilcox

Installation view, The 80s: Art of the Eighties, Albertina Modern, Vienna, October 17, 2021–February 13, 2022. Artwork, left to right: © Jiří Georg Dokoupil, © Hubert Schmalix, © Albert Oehlen. Photo: © Ana Paula Franco/Albertina, Wien 2021

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The 80s
Art of the Eighties

October 17, 2021–February 13, 2022
Albertina Modern, Vienna
www.albertina.at

Some consider the 1980s to be the most important decade for the art of our age. For the first time, art was no longer determined by a dominant style, such as abstraction or Pop, but rather embodied an unprecedented stylistic pluralism that was a hallmark of postmodernism. This exhibition, curated by Albertina Modern director Angela Stief, examines the variety of artistic approaches and strategies that defined the era. Work by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Albert Oehlen, Richard Prince, Andy Warhol, and Franz West is included.

Installation view, The 80s: Art of the Eighties, Albertina Modern, Vienna, October 17, 2021–February 13, 2022. Artwork, left to right: © Jiří Georg Dokoupil, © Hubert Schmalix, © Albert Oehlen. Photo: © Ana Paula Franco/Albertina, Wien 2021

Balthus, Paysage de Monte Calvello, 1978 © Balthus

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Découpage
A Labour of Love

July 1–October 17, 2021
Tarmak22, Gstaad Saanen Airport, Switzerland
www.tarmak22.com

Découpage presents more than 150 cut-paper works made in the nineteenth and twentieth century by Swiss masters. Tracing the origins and development of the paper cutout, the exhibition honors the craft’s history and its Swiss heritage while creating a dialogue with a selection of contemporary artworks brought to Gstaad by collaborators including Gagosian. Work by Balthus, Richard Prince, and Setsuko is included.

Balthus, Paysage de Monte Calvello, 1978 © Balthus

Gregory Crewdson, Back Lot, 2018–19 © Gregory Crewdson

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Road Rage

June 25–September 20, 2021
The Church, Sag Harbor, New York
www.sagharborchurch.org

Road Rage brings together works by twenty-four artists who use the car as subject or material. Dating from the 1960s to the present, the paintings, photographs, sculptures, drawings, and animated film on display consider automobiles as tools of travel, consumption, and commerce, and as icons of wealth, class, leisure, power, destruction, and pollution. Work by Gregory Crewdson and Richard Prince is included.

Gregory Crewdson, Back Lot, 2018–19 © Gregory Crewdson

Installation view, The Human Body, Hill Art Foundation, New York, April 29–June 26, 2021. Artwork, left to right: © Jenny Saville, © Richard Prince, © Ron Mueck, Anthony van Dyck, Peter Paul Rubens. Photo: Matthew Herrmann

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The Human Body

April 29–June 26, 2021
Hill Art Foundation, New York
hillartfoundation.org

This exhibition, curated from the Hill Collection by Karel Schampers, examines the human body through figurative work from the last five hundred years. The installation spans two floors and visitors are encouraged to view the works from different levels and vantage points, creating a dialogue across diverse periods and mediums. The foundation’s collection of Renaissance bronzes  is featured alongside works by artists such as Francis Bacon, Richard Prince, Jenny Saville, Rudolf Stingel, and Andy Warhol.

Installation view, The Human Body, Hill Art Foundation, New York, April 29–June 26, 2021. Artwork, left to right: © Jenny Saville, © Richard Prince, © Ron Mueck, Anthony van Dyck, Peter Paul Rubens. Photo: Matthew Herrmann

Installation view, Feelings: Kunst und Emotion, Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich, November 7, 2019–October 4, 2020. Artwork © Richard Prince

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Feelings
Kunst und Emotion

November 7, 2019–October 4, 2020
Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich
www.pinakothek-der-moderne.de

One hundred paintings, objects, and films from contemporary artists invite the viewer to intuitively approach art from an emotional perspective. What does art provoke in us? To what extent does our view of art depend on our personal experiences and memories? This exhibition seeks to encourage this direct dialogue between artwork and viewer in order to stimulate an intense emotional engagement. Work by Gregory Crewdson, Richard Prince, and Cindy Sherman is included.

Installation view, Feelings: Kunst und Emotion, Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich, November 7, 2019–October 4, 2020. Artwork © Richard Prince

Installation view, Third Dimension: Works from the Brant Foundation, Brant Foundation, New York, November 13, 2019–September 3, 2020. Artwork, front to back: © Urs Fischer, © Dan Flavin

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Third Dimension
Works from the Brant Foundation

November 13, 2019–September 3, 2020
Brant Foundation, New York
brantfoundation.org

Bringing together more than twenty artists integral to the Brant Foundation’s collection, this exhibition offers a glimpse into the multifaceted practices of artists whose work Peter M. Brant has collected over the past fifty years. Work by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Urs Fischer, Mike Kelley, Adam McEwen, Richard Prince, Andy Warhol, and Franz West is included.

Installation view, Third Dimension: Works from the Brant Foundation, Brant Foundation, New York, November 13, 2019–September 3, 2020. Artwork, front to back: © Urs Fischer, © Dan Flavin

Takashi Murakami, Open Your Hands Wide, Embrace Happiness!, 2010 © 2010 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All rights reserved

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Happy!

October 27, 2019–July 5, 2020
NSU Art Museum, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida
nsuartmuseum.org

Happy! presents contemporary works produced by artists who aim to engage the viewer emotionally. In their works, as in life, sorrow and happiness are intertwined. The exhibition follows a multigenerational trajectory from the mid-twentieth century to today. Work by Jeff Koons, Takashi Murakami, Richard Prince, and Andy Warhol is included.

Takashi Murakami, Open Your Hands Wide, Embrace Happiness!, 2010 © 2010 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All rights reserved

Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (da Vinci Mona Lisa), 2016, Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation © Jeff Koons

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POP Power from Warhol to Koons
Masterworks from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation

September 28, 2019–March 8, 2020
Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke, Virginia
www.taubmanmuseum.org

POP Power celebrates a perennial movement that revels in the new and the now, the celebrity and the commodity, and art made accessible for the masses. Work by Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons, Roy Lichtenstein, Takashi Murakami, Richard Prince, and Andy Warhol is included.

Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (da Vinci Mona Lisa), 2016, Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation © Jeff Koons

Works from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum’s collection in storage. Artwork, clockwise from top left: Jean Dubuffet, Martin Barré, and Wifredo Lam © 2020 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris; Willem de Kooning © 2020 The Willem de Kooning Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; David Hammons © David Hammons; Paul Wonner © Estate of Paul Wonner and William Theophilius Brown, Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, California; Cecilia Vicuña © Cecilia Vicuña; Maria Helena Vieira da Silva © 2020 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris. Photo: David M. Heald

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Artistic License
Six Takes on the Guggenheim Collection

May 24, 2019–January 12, 2020
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
www.guggenheim.org

This exhibition celebrates the institution’s extensive twentieth-century holdings through the eyes of six contemporary artists, all of whom have contributed to shaping the museum’s history with their own pivotal solo shows: Cai Guo-Qiang, Paul Chan, Jenny Holzer, Julie Mehretu, Richard Prince, and Carrie Mae Weems. Through collection highlights and rarely seen works from the turn of the century to 1980, this presentation includes nearly three hundred paintings, sculptures, works on paper, and installations selected by the six artists that engage with the cultural discourse of their time. Work by Francis Bacon, Willem de Kooning, and Lawrence Weiner is included.

Works from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum’s collection in storage. Artwork, clockwise from top left: Jean Dubuffet, Martin Barré, and Wifredo Lam © 2020 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris; Willem de Kooning © 2020 The Willem de Kooning Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; David Hammons © David Hammons; Paul Wonner © Estate of Paul Wonner and William Theophilius Brown, Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, California; Cecilia Vicuña © Cecilia Vicuña; Maria Helena Vieira da Silva © 2020 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris. Photo: David M. Heald

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Richard Prince
Portraits

October 25, 2019–January 5, 2020
Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit
mocadetroit.org

Mining images from advertising, social media, and entertainment since the late 1970s, Richard Prince has redefined concepts of authorship, ownership, and aura. Applying his understanding of the complex issues surrounding representation in the context of contemporary art, he has developed a unique signature—one filled with echoes of other images, yet unquestionably his own.

Installation view, What is an edition, anyway?, McEvoy Foundation for the Arts, San Francisco, May 24–September 7, 2019. Photo: Henrik Kam

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What is an edition, anyway?

May 24–September 7, 2019
McEvoy Foundation for the Arts, San Francisco
www.mcevoyarts.org

What is an edition, anyway? explores the traditions, conditions, and inventive expressions of the contemporary artist’s multiple. Photography, performance, illustration, technology, and installation further explore the notion of the edition as an idea reproduced in limited quantities. Work by Richard Prince and Taryn Simon is included.

Installation view, What is an edition, anyway?, McEvoy Foundation for the Arts, San Francisco, May 24–September 7, 2019. Photo: Henrik Kam

Georg Baselitz, Lehr nich ratte much wilm (Lelf bal wile), 2013 © Georg Baselitz 2018

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Counterpoint
Selections from the Peter Marino Collection

July 28–September 23, 2018
Southampton Arts Center, New York
southamptonartscenter.org

In 1978 Peter Marino acquired an artwork from Andy Warhol. Since then, the Peter Marino Collection has grown to encompass hundreds of paintings and mixed-media pieces representing some of the most notable artists of today. Work by Georg Baselitz, Glenn Brown, Damien Hirst, Anselm Kiefer, Richard Prince, and Andy Warhol is included.

Georg Baselitz, Lehr nich ratte much wilm (Lelf bal wile), 2013 © Georg Baselitz 2018

Ellen Gallagher, Untitled (10), 2000 © Ellen Gallagher

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Praying for Time

March 2–July 8, 2018
Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts
www.brandeis.edu

Marked by the fall of the Berlin Wall, the attacks of September 11, and civil war, the end of the twentieth century can also be viewed as a time that presaged immense global revolutions, both social and digital, that have transformed our world. Praying for Time reflects the diversity of voices and concerns in art produced during that pivotal period from 1980 through the early 2000s. Work by Gregory Crewdson, Ellen Gallagher, Richard Prince, Richard Serra, and Andy Warhol is included. 

Ellen Gallagher, Untitled (10), 2000 © Ellen Gallagher

Ashley Bickerton, Tormented Self-Portrait (Susie at Arles) #2, 1988 © Ashley Bickerton

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Brand New
Art and Commodity in the 1980s

February 14–May 13, 2018
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC
hirshhorn.si.edu

Brand New focuses on the 1980s as the iconic decade when artwork became a commodity and the artist, a brand. This exhibition of nearly 150 works examines the origins and rise of a new generation of artists in New York who blurred the lines between art, entertainment, and commerce—a shift that continues to define contemporary art today. Work by Ashley Bickerton, Richard Prince, and Andy Warhol is included.

Ashley Bickerton, Tormented Self-Portrait (Susie at Arles) #2, 1988 © Ashley Bickerton

Willem de Kooning, Woman and Bicycle, 1952–53, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York © The Willem de Kooning Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Human Interest
Portraits from the Whitney’s Collection

April 2, 2016–April 2, 2017
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
whitney.org

Human Interest offers new perspectives on one of art’s oldest genres. Drawn entirely from the museum’s holdings, the more than two hundred works in the exhibition show changing approaches to portraiture from the early 1900s until today. Bringing iconic works together with lesser-known examples and recent acquisitions in a range of mediums, the exhibition unfolds in eleven thematic sections. Work by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Willem de Kooning, Roe Ethridge, Duane Hanson, Mike KelleySally MannMan RayBruce NaumanRichard PrinceEd RuschaCindy ShermanRudolf StingelAndy Warhol, and Jonas Wood is included.

Willem de Kooning, Woman and Bicycle, 1952–53, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York © The Willem de Kooning Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York